BABYMETAL in Nikkei Business online

Here a translation of BABYMETAL interview from japanese site Nikkei Business online

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Babymetal is a Japanese music group that gets best attention worldwide not by its idol-ness but by its performance. By researching its popularity coming from, we might see the new possibility of advertising Japan Culture, Cool Japan to be said.

Its success began with MV of Gimme Chocolate in ’14, its viewcount is over 32 million now. Its album was on Billboard Chart. It hit No.1 on iTunes Metal and Rock chart in western countries and southeast asian countries. Babymetal did its world tour last year in UK, France, Germany, U.S. And Canada. In the UK they performed in front of 65,000 audience at Sonisphere Festival, their quality of singing, dancing, songs, plays were praised.

Then they made their appearances on other music festivals over the world, now in their world tour again at 15 sites in 10 countries. Big names like Metallica, Megadeth and Dragonforce are on the same festivals. And they were awarded in two of popular Metal magazines. They’ll perform a solo live at famous Wembley Arena with 12,000 audience next year.
This is a series of accomplishments as Japanese artist, and exceptional as an idol. They are the youngest solo performers at Budokan, also did at big arenas like SSA and Makuhari Messe. On the other hand, they rarely appear on TV, don’t do any handshake event like other idols. Release periods of songs are slower, they’re far from “National Idol”, even their idol-ness is getting disappearing in Japan.

Then, what in them gets attention from people around the world? I (the author) am a huge fan of them, my wife sent doubtful eyes on me being excited about watching underage girls singing and dancing on YouTube. Now I believe two of us are fans…I assume these eyes are familiar to many middle aged men. Ages of Babymetal audience are varied. Men and women. Their types of music too, from Metal to idols. Fans in their 40s and 50s are not so rare.

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I stood alone at a platform of Keiyo line in Tokyo station, in the band tee with red and black, to their concert at Makuhari. I felt weakness remembering my wife’s glare, but noticed many men, like me, in the same tee. Solo attendees were there. So I was much encouraged to Makuhari.Metal in Japan is said to reach its peak in 80’s, then lost its moment. So they would be that old boys who loved Metal and its heroes in these days. After long years, they found Babymetal, their love of Metal firing up again, and took their feet to the venue again. There’s a reason why people distant from idol culture accept Babymetal. They don’t use Metal as a flavor of idol performance, but they try to pursue Metal as their own power, in a high level.

The concept of Babymetal revealed through Kamishibai, is Metal Resistance (a movement of three girls taking back the moment of Metal). Each member of the back band is top notch players in Japan, their solo performances are in a program. The girls barely talk in their lives, songs performed nonstop. A lot of homage to metal songs grab metal fans’ hearts. From their lives we feel that they aims to be more Metal than idol.

Here’s the point why Babymetal is getting its success over the world. Heavy Metal has dedicated fan base in western countries and Babymetal ran straight into it, not as an idol with Metal fashion but as Metal with girls singing and dancing.

Regarding Metal is western culture, Babymetal can be said to localize idol and Kawaii boldly to western Metal culture. Not to mention, it’s not about deodorizing a smell of idol, but about making a fusion. Metal instinct of pursuing performance skills and idol ones of appealing to majority are two opposites, so making fusion of the two in a higher standard results in a unique performance never been for a Metal fans, gives an impression vividly. There’re discussions going about Babymetal is Metal or idol, or a real thing or not. The fact itself is some kind of proof that Babymetal makes the fusion to some extent, and it’s innovation.

An uncompromising fusion of opposites in a high standard – to generate something new. Babymetal might be the case of it. They even make this attempt to their ongoing story as Metal Resistance.
This can be adopted to other Japanese contents making their way to overseas? It would be just about combining something different into one. But pursuing it to the limit, new contents for new markets would be made. A problem is that such things could survive long or not. Babymetal just released its debut album. As a fan I hope their release of the second and keeps us surprised.

BABYMETAL exclusive interview

Here is a english translation from NY 新聞社社長の摩天楼★日記

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Q: So first of all, your faces are small! (Note: A small face is really highly praised in Japan. One of the girls’ obsessions.)

Su: No, no no no no (laugh).
Moa: I don’t think so (laugh).

Q: You did great yesterday. NYC audiences were so hyped.
Su: Thank you. It’s our first live at NYC, so I was full of anxiety about what audience was like here and how our live went, but I was so surprised and happy when I heard audiences loud from the dressing room.
Yui: And once the live began a lot of clapping and singing along happened, so I had a very happy time.

Q: Most of them were New Yorker… Americans.
Moa: Yes, I was so surprised!
Su: It’s so great, wasn’t it? Because we could see their faces so well.
Yui: We even could see them at balcony.

Q: And they sang along in Japanese.
Su: There is a solo song of mine titled as Akatsuki, its lyrics are difficult even for Japanese but fans overseas learned it and sang along as they could, I was so impressed!

Q: How did you feel first when live at NYC was booked?
Su: An announcement was done in the middle of our live in Summer Sonic! We were never noticed about it and it was shown on a screen at the very end of the introduction video, a simple statement only (laugh). We took a rest at the moment and saying “What?” is all we could do (laugh).
Moa: Yes, yes (laugh).

Q: Didn’t you know at all till the moment?
Su: No, we didn’t. We just said, “Really? Really? Really?” (laugh) We panicked little just after that. Moametal and I saw it but Yuimetal didn’t, and she said, “What? It must be kidding,” and “What? What?” So we couldn’t talk about the same thing. Soon a next song began and we scrambled to the stage saying, “Time to go! Time to go!” (laugh) We were full of surprise at the announcement but full of joy because I felt like retuning here after seeing the town and warmth of people at NYC in last May.
Yui: I was so surprised when I knew it at the live with audience, but also I was so, so much happy. I felt the people were so kind at the last visit in May. I was looking forward to seeing how these people look like at a live.

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Q: Is it normal to know live schedules like that?
Su: Yes, it always is.
Moa: Always, isn’t it?
Yui: We knew about The World Tour on stage, too.

Q: See. It’s a Babymetal way, isn’t it? (laugh) But you would do it well at the end of the day.
All: (Laugh)

Q: Support acts for Lady Gaga’s in the last Spring were noticed much.
Moa: What I learned by my own eyes from watching Lady Gaga-san’s show in the last May was that a live is beyond languages. Lady Gaga-san’s songs were English which I don’t understand, but I could feel something. I remembered that music is universal. So when the NYC live was booked I felt like delivering my feelings (even I could sing only in Japanese) as a presenter this time.
Su: Lady Gaga-san’s song and Babymetal’s are different in genres, aren’t they? So I was so anxious whether audiences accepted us or not. And I remembered at the very first they looked like, “What were these girls?” with a lot of “?” in their minds. But the more acts we played, the more I could feel they got some fun with us. I did remember one of her staff said to us, “You’re so good on stage!”
Moa: We played five stages. At the final one we did warm-ups with her back dancers (laugh). (Not only Gaga-san but) also staff were all very friendly.

Q: You looks so happy.
Moa: Yes! (laugh)

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Q: What was Gaga-san like in person?
Su: We three had a talk with Gaga-san before her live, she gave us an advice kindly. We got almost paralyzed in front of her but she gave us words and never was bothered to understand us speaking in Japanese. She is full of kindness.
Yui: And in a middle of singing Gimme Choco I looked at a side of the stage she’s there in a long time to support us!
Moa: I happened to look at a side and Lady Gaga-san’s there and I said, “Gosh!” in my head (laugh)

Q: It’s surprising, no doubt (laugh).
Yui: She’s so kind.

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Q: Are lives overseas different from those in Japan?
Su: Audiences in Japan tend to fill out in sync, and those overseas tend to sing along. My impression is that they enjoy songs as a whole.

Q: Did you have fun in NYC live?
All: Absolutely yes! (in sync)

Q: Will you come back here again?
All: We will! (In sync)

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Q: For last words, your messages to readers in America, please?
Su: Yes. What I try to do is to do best by doing what we always did. It might be needed to do anything different, but I want to deliver good Babymetal as usual. I want to deliver it to fans in America, too. I came to the city and felt warmth of its people, so I want to be here again. I hope you looking forward to seeing us in the city again!
Moa: I want to build a new genre Babymetal by blending Kawaii and Metal. So I want to do what we only can do now and in future. I was so happy to have a chance to perform in NYC, so I want to be here to see you again.
Yui: Babymetal is distinct not only by our songs but also by our dances, so I want more people to know that. So I want to improve ourselves a lot enough to deliver that to many people as possible. I’ll be back.
(End of the interview)

Bassist BOH interview from Hedoban magazine (vol.4)

A bassist of Kami Band – BABYMETAL’s back band – Bassist BOH talked about his early days, principle of life and music and love for masters of bass and BABYMETAL! This is a translation from Hedoban magazine vol.4, first apperared on Reddit r/BABYMETAL.

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Q : In this interview, I’d like to hear from you how a player with super technique acquired it and built a reputation, also like to know your music roots and current activities.

BOH : It was around the end of my fifteen… Just before my graduation from a junior high. I went to one of my friends’ house and there were a guitar and a bass. I tried both but only four strings it had so… (laugh)

Q : The common “It must be easy to master!” thing (laugh).

B : Right (laugh). So it was from my high school days when I begin my band life. It takes amount of time even to be a bass player of some extent, doesn’t it? I kept practicing in my room everyday right after school, joined Keion-Bu (a light music club) in my high school, formed a copy band and practiced. We didn’t do our original stuff back then. We boys in my days were like… such as “Wanna play Glay!” “Luna Sea!” And girls “Wanna sing Judy & Mary!” We’re like that… I sometimes joined to copy bands that mimicked major ones in top 10 charts. I felt like wandering for sessions since then. I wanted more chances to play my favorite songs from various bands. I didn’t have a feeling of belonging to any specific band. And at school festivals it was difficult to make my application as one man bassist, so I had kept good relationships with bad boys in advance to keep them practicing seriously (laugh), to make my band improved in a good mood. I liked to do all these things.

Q : Was there any reputation of you back then as “I know a cool bassist!” among these boys?

B : I concentrated on my play and didn’t think I was cool, but people around me said so. Same in my music school days. I was a kind of man to devote myself to improve my technical skill.

Q : There are those, as an example, who began a metal band and become a person to say “Who do you think I am?” when he’s just asked some J-pop bass guitar. You weren’t that kind of player, were you?

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B : No, I wasn’t. Grooves are so different between genres. I rather liked to find new styles of play through various experiences. Cool bass sound isn’t a major contributor to make a song better. So I learned even from playing uninteresting songs to me, or I didn’t like assigned notes, or I didn’t feel “these phrases came to me.” And my play turned out to be a piece of ensemble and songs became cool in the end when I played as I told.

Q : And you are famous for the six-string bass guitar. When did you begin to use it?

B : 18 years old. I used a four-string one from 15 to in a middle of 18 years old. I have been in love with Billy Sheehan for a long time, so I loved shredding and chordal play. But I had misunderstood completely… that these were normal play of the bass because of my devotion of mimicking Billy Sheehan (laugh).

Q : Did you always like Metal?

B : I only liked Billy Sheehan so much (laugh). We copied almost Mr. Big only. I went from Billy Sheehan to Talas and David Lee Roth and more. Then he began Niacin, I just followed him into Fusion world.

Q : Do others with the six-string naturally catch your eyes?

B : There is little communication happened because bassists with it is rare to be met. A six-string is relatively new. The one invented that is Anthony Jackson, a jazz bassist. So the six-string seemed not for Rock or other genres originally. And if someone uses it for Metal, we must be interested, right? And John Myung of Dream Theater. The band doesn’t rely on momentum. So easily they play songs strictly constructed, so difficult for other players. With astonishingly tight rhythm. I got surprised so much. I began to put my eyes on polymeters. On how to count that. On making phrases with scales normally too difficult to remember. On playing these things smartly. So Dream Theater left great influence on me.

Q : I don’t know much about instruments, but your double-handed tapping gives me awe. Is it an influence from Billy Sheehan?

B : Billy Sheehan is one of them. Another is a jazz bassist Victor Wooten. He’s the man, even he did one song with tapping only. As for tapping we see a right hand first, but a left hand does pulling and hammering, doesn’t it? I misunderstood these were also one of tapping techniques, so I only do them by my right hand… it might sound odd to say “only”. For me, doing tapping is the same as playing the piano. My fingers tapping in double-handed play are hammers in the piano. So I just imagined playing the piano in the middle of my solo play for Babymetal at Budokan, as an example. I made my sound with multiple fingers on multiple strings, contrary to the guitar. It is very much different from conventional tapping.

Q : Who do you think are great bassists other than Billy Sheehan?

B : John Myung is astonishing as I mentioned. And it might be controversial… I like Robert Trujillo as a most successive bassist in Metallica. His stability is surprising. I saw them playing at Summer Sonic, he looked cohering other member playing free. And his play has so much power as his appearance (laugh). But it is not brutal but sensitive. He had played so funky with a lot of slapping as shown in his former career (in Infectious Grooves), but now in Metallica he plays so much differently which fascinates me. He plays in different styles even he doesn’t like.

Q : Studio musicians don’t seem to stick with live performance, but BOH-San loves it, don’t you?

B : I do! I think nothing happens without taking a chance. And requirements for studio musicians have been changed, we have to do better on stage now. Standing still behind main performers isn’t enough anymore. Computers are everywhere, so demand of us… our customers has been decreasing. Our customer is an artist. In this difficult circumstance, I have to have something different from others to get more offers. Needless to say seniors with career are outstanding skillful musician, I have to catch up with these people. When I asked myself what they couldn’t do, I play the six-string as my main instrument. Someone gave me an advice as “The six-string is prospective. There is a few people with this,” once I began to learn it. But when I began to use it they said “That monster of the bass guitar gives you few offers. It’s just acrobatics.” I had no ear to listen, even I misunderstood that they didn’t give me an advise but express their frustration of unable to play it (laugh).

Q : BOH-San seems to have quite a strong mentality, don’t you?

B : I’m positive in nature. One thing I always avoid is to fool or speak bad for opinions and plays of others. That’s what I keep trying. There are many moments to want to say something bad like “This man’s breakdown is bad as hell!” There are also moments of “You should play more seriously.” But I don’t say any of these. It will be more productive just to imagine the way that they can play better. When being forced to do something too much, everyone can say “It’s impossible! I quit!” But a feeling is nothing to compare if you finally made it with impossible level of effort you could.

Q : From what you said I think such attitude is a wisdom of BOH-San who survives only with a bass guitar. And what was your biggest work after your graduation from music school?

B : My first one was about a song Hitoiro of Mika Nakajima. It’s about the time of a movie NANA 2. I played at lives and on TVs… in the back band. It’s my first time to attend to Kouhaku Uta-gassen.

Q : How old were you at the time?

B : I was 24 back then.

Q : So young for it!

B : I don’t know well about it. I also played at Music Station and Utaban in the same period, I was 24, too when I experienced prime time music programs as a member of back bands and jobs at large venues like Makuhari Messe at the first time.

Q : Experiences of big stages as a back band of Mika Nakashima and others… Do you think these experiences give you much feedback?

B : I had played only live-house like smaller places. Kawasaki Club Citta was largest in my career back then. But it was suddenly upgraded to hall-class places far larger… It’s like I was in a dream, isn’t it? Like I played in a TV program that I watched just before.

Q : It’s even great that you went straight to Kouhaku, wasn’t it?

B : At the end of the day, a session musician like me is a job that owes most to others. We only play behind the famous. We can’t be there if they are not there. And tons of pro musicians are there around me, including my elders. But these famous ones just choose me. I remember it impressed me lot. It also added more responsibility on me. To be honest, I was picked up from those who were better than me. I couldn’t sleep every these days because of the responsibility or… nervousness from the responsibility. Not to say there are air plays for TV jobs, but there’s times when I couldn’t stop my hands trembling even at air plays.

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Q : You play bold as a god of base at BABYMETAL lives, I can’t tell whether it’s because of these experiences or not…

B : By contraries now I can express myself better at larger stage like that. I might get nervous at small live houses of 100 or 200 audiences though I haven’t played at such venues lately.

Q : Is it because of closer eyes of audience?

B : Rather because of severe tolerance for sounds I make? We can hear all the nuances in a small place. But I say I play at larger places with a wish that all of my notes hit audiences right. At Budokan audience can get a clearer view of backwards of the stage than expected even from far behind. Artists look so small from the audience, but audiences are closer than expected from the stage… Like “So close as it is!” More, as to BABYMETAL other members give me a lot of sense of ease. And a will of the trio for performance is tremendous, so I can’t afford to take a single breath. All of Kami Band members must share a tension that the trio defeats us if we do it lasy. We are leaning a lot more from playing with them than with long-career artists. But it’s not because such little girls do their best, but because we just have fun from playing together with three artists. Babymetal is the most enjoyable in my activities.

Q : Was there any request from Kobametal at the moment when you became a god of bass?

B : The first one from Kobametal was, “No need to hold back by a reason why they are a girl or an idol. Just do it as heavy and loud as you can.” All the member of Kami Band loves Metal, but can’t do like that in another jobs, can we? So nothing makes us happier so much because we do our job and can enjoy it!

Q : So the feeling I got that Kami Band must have enjoyed at lives from footages and pictures is true, isn’t it!

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B : I bet. But at the same time Babymetal is one of the hardest jobs ever. Its play is severe. And gods of drum and gods of guitar are incredibly good and severe. Once a member play wrong a little bit… even get out of the rhythm a little bit, all others throw a look at the one. (laugh) and more to say, it has a concept that we deliver only a good play as possible that we developed as possible. Our first objective is to re-create original sound. First we try to play it live just the same as programmed version, then we make some arrangements for live when we feel odd though we played just the same. Anyway it’s only for minor things.

Q : Ijime, Dame, Zettai sounds like band sound. On the contrary songs like IINE! doesn’t so much. So are songs like IINE! more difficult for you?

B : IINE! is difficult! (laugh) Difficult from its first note! Its killer part is something that normal human don’t do… (laugh) I play that part just the same as the original source. The first concept of Kami Band was “Be technical.” But having smooth movement of fingers, good rhythm, tight sound and such are just minimum requirements, top on that need good collaboration to develop songs.

Q : Which is the most memorable Babymetal song for BOH-San?

B : It’s Akatsuki and Ijime, Dame, Zettai. It’s not because of technical things but because of their structure which are so complicated and long. Paces are faster than those I play in my head (laugh), so once I play late I’m over. As for bass technique the most difficult is… Akumu no Rondo is difficult, but… Babymetal Death would be the one. All the bass riffs are unison with the guitar’s and my fingering is same as the guitar’s… A neck of the bass is wider than the guitar, so I have to keep my fingers wide to play it through.

Q : Is it impossible without a six-string one?

B : You can do with a five-string one. But the song requires positions that normally are not to be used, so it is the most difficult in physical and technical aspects. And its tempo is fast.

Q : Which song is do you think suitable for players as a first song to copy Babymetal bass?

B : I think it’s basic to master Catch Me If You Can. Or simpler ones like Doki Doki Morning. It’s simply impossible to begin from Megitsune or Ijime, Dame, Zettai. (laugh)

Q : Which Babymetal live left you an impression most?

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B : It’s Budokan, yeah. The girls got a record of the youngest performer there by that live. On top of that, the stage was not a half configuration but 360-degree one with audiences packed as possible for their music genre… I felt they were going to go worldwide while I played on the stage! There was a power in the hall at the live. And my conviction at the live came from not only the power but also the moment when I felt future big wave yet to come. I never thought of that hype for my solo bass play. They didn’t come to see a back band but the trio at first, did they? I couldn’t help but getting hyped by that applause from audiences that came to see the trio singing and dancing.

Q : You did shredding and tapping in rehearsals at Summer Sonic, Loud Park and other performances.

B : I did, I did. (laugh)

Q : Audiences cried, “Woooooow!” with hype. (laugh)

B : It’s also beyond my expectation. (laugh) For me I just made sure in advance whether those super-fast shredding phrases sounded right or not. It’s okay if it sounds right, because any play in a showtime is assured. I play that just for confirmation. I don’t play that for my exposure. (laugh) It’s just a confirmation purpose.

Q : Really? I thought there was some intension in you. (laugh)

B : It’s my routine for confirming my sound that I do some rough shredding and it’s okay if it sounds right, especially when we don’t have enough time to adjust our sound at a rehearsal. Any simple play sounds right when such fast play can sound right, doesn’t it?

Q : I see. So these audience reactions were out of the blue for you?

B : Totally. (laugh) but I am rather a type of person who says “Because I always want to play as much as I can!” when fans ask me why. (laugh) And I have no other choice to say that. (laugh)

Q : What is the most interesting aspect of Babymetal do you think to BOH-San? Though your answer might be overlapping to what you said now.

B : It would be that it is a fusion of completely different things together, and no one including Babymetal themselves knows what’s next. At the beginning of the assignment last year, I never thought that it could sell out Budokan and go abroad in that early. It’s beyond my expectations that reactions would be so good like that? and it hit the Billboard chart? More of it, Babymetal is that viral but I am only mentioned and recognized as a god of bass… I feel so good about that.

Q : Wait… You feel so good about that. (laugh)

B : It is so much interesting to me. (laugh)

Q : In my image as an amateur, all of you are an independent player. So I think you would want to sell your names as possible.

B : There’s such urge in my heart indeed. But while I play with hiding my name, only die-hard Babymetal fans do their studies to find my name. Those who know my name really love Babymetal. Only these people know my name… It makes me feel good. I have some fun from tweeting not “I’m going to play for Babymetal tomorrow!” by myself but “I’m on a rehearsal now,” with vague description, then retweets go spreading slowly. Now is the time that strong appeals like “I’m going to do it!” don’t appeal a lot but rather things hidden from people make the way to the world… Its power is surprising, I think.

Q : I have now an impression from you that you love Babymetal so much.

B : Yes, I do! No Kami Band member hates Babymetal at all! We can do what we like. Yes, we must overcome difficult riffs to play strictly and unfamiliar phrases to master perfectly. But. There’s less freedom to improvise, but shredding loud at large venues makes us happy as a musician and there’s not so much opportunities to do that in other stages. There are not so much opportunities to use all of my skills. In other words, Babymetal isn’t easy at all as “Let’s play to make a singer to sing easy.” We were asked to put a pedal to the metal. (laugh)

Kami Band

Q : Have you never been asked such a request before?

B : No. (laugh) Most of them were “Please make the volume lower because we couldn’t hear the voice.” On the contrary in Babymetal we band member rather said, “It’s crazy, isn’t it !? It’s beyond loud, isn’t it!?” (laugh)

Q : For the end of this interview, what’s your advice to those who are in a music school with a dream of becoming a pro soloist, and those who want to make a living as a soloist?

B : I think cooperative mind is priority.

Q : Cooperative mind?

B : Yes. Not to mention that we go forward with a will to do what we want to, but a point is whether we have flexibility for others or not. When you are asked to play any specific bass, you better not say that you won’t because it is against your belief, instead say that you’re happy to do it but you want to try your style if they allow. Only those who can say like that survive. And those who simply love to learn music do. It is whether or not you have open mind… or creative feeling who aren’t the brain-trust, learn it and forget it and keep accepting new things… even things out of music theory. And more, whether you can follow advices from others or not.

Whether you can keep your mouth shut or not – you better not say much, but hold it in your mind even if you have a ton of words to their advices. It’s different from being obsequious. It feels so good when we do it without objection and surpass those who tell us what to do, doesn’t it? One thing everyone misunderstands is that they try hard to be unique. I believe uniqueness is something only others can see. All we can do is to do as our hearts go and others evaluate whether you are unique or not. Others say, “BOH is a rare thing with a six-string,” or “He plays the bass as if it weren’t it.” Their evaluation includes my outfits. So I never think of insisting that playing as a member of Kami Band with that face painting is my uniqueness. What I do now completely owes those around me. I’m so happy that I began to be recognized by these and those things spreading out, but I don’t do all of them intentionally. Otherwise what I do intentionally is to deliver a good play. It’s the best way, isn’t it?

Dom Lawson interview with Hedoban magazine (vol. 5)

The man who runs column on a major paper The Guardian, who is one of main writers of one of the top metal magazines Metal Hammer and who recognized Babymetal earliest and highest in the UK, finally came to Hedoban which pushes Babymetal as hard as can in Japan!

Dom Lawson
Dom Lawson

He was interviewed with Japanese metal magazine Hedoban before the second UK live at O2 Academy and its translation as follows:

Q : First, please tell us your metal experience as a listener and metal fan.

D : I spend almost of my life with listening to metal! Metal has taken my heart since I knew Iron Maiden, Motorhead and Twisted Sisters at ten years old. I devoted to thrash metal in my teenage years, and have listened to all sub genres of extreme metal from death metal to grind core to black metal, and underground music. I also like commercial and modern ones, but my true passion wants traditional metal and its descendants. I have listened to music of countless genres since then, my passion for metal is beyond ones for other genres. And I feel myself belong to it. Now I got a job to write about metal and drown in music with best circumstances. It’s so great!

Q : I went to see performance at Sonisphire and solo show at The Forum, I was surprised by an amount of metalheads there even more than those in Japan. Especially audiences in a solo show at The Forum was unexpectedly hyped, and it was one of the best hype of all. What in Babymetal do you think moved metalheads in UK?

D : Really? The impression might not be 100% precise. To be honest I was surprised to the fact that Babymetal got a big applause at Sonisphire. UK metal fans are so varied so we don’t tell what goes big and what not. But it was true that their appearance in Sonisphire this time gained tons of recognition all of a sudden. Fans who saw their stage got to know that Kami Band was real metallers and have superb talent. Also passionate performance of the trio of Babymetal had enough power of conviction. A power of making audiences enjoy flourished from the stage and it affected on the audiences. Yes, some somber and difficult audiences must have disliked a concept of Babymetal. But they react like that to anything.

Q : Have you ever had a interest in any Japanese metal band before Babymetal came to you?

D : I’m a big fan of Sigh and Church of Misery. And I like Boredoms, Ruins, Melt-Banana, Zeni Geva and more. Japanese bands give me an impression that they add new and a little crazy interpretation into established ideas on music. It makes music more fun and exotic for eastern listeners including me.

Q : In Japan die-hard Iron Maiden fans are recognized to be a high ranked metal fan and called as Gachi Metarā (true metalheads). And it is true that many in these Gachi Metarā never admit so-called perverted metal. What do you think of that, as one of die-hard Iron Maiden fans?

D : Yes, there are a lot of traditional metal fans in the UK, and they don’t accept anything but conservative and authentic metal sound. Fans of Maiden might support these narrow mindedness in a sense. But most of metal fans in the UK have an open mind about music. It would be because the UK is a major market and we have opportunities to listen to all bands, all kinds of music in the world. So there would be a lot of Maiden fans who also love Babymetal because it’s new, different a little and enjoying music, isn’t it? Not everyone listen to the music all the time along with a rule of what metal should be.

Q : Changing the subject, when and how was your first encounter with Babymetal?

D : Same as the many people I suppose, at first I knew Babymetal from a link which someone posted on Twitter. I clicked the link and watched a video, then I became a fan in a moment.

Q : Which song was it that you listened first?

D : I’m not 100% sure, but I think Megitsune was my first experience. I liked it in a moment. It’s enough heavy to me as a metalhead, its Pop aspect was also good. Good quality Pop music does no harm at all.

Q : So, which is your favorite Babymetal song?

D : I have two, Iine! and Ijime, Dame, Zettai. Iine! is crazy about mixture of different styles of music and has fine composition. Ijime, Dame, Zettai is a gorgeous epic metal song with killer melody!

Q : Hedoban thinks that Babymetal the first album is something that will become one of the best metal albums. What do you think of this album?

D : I think it’s a great album, too. All songs in it are powerful, also performance and production are first class. On top of that, it’s completely different from any other existing songs around us. I feel so refreshed by listening to it. I listen to it many times and my 11 years old daughter says she loves the album.

Q : Was Sonisphire your first time to see them live? I think it sounded different from sound sources or videos…?

D : I have seen Babymetal only at Sonisphire. I think the performance was minimum version of their full lives that they always do in Japan, even so it was the performance that exceeded my expectation enough. It was unexpectedly fun from the beginning to end!

Q : Then, which is your favorite member of Babymetal?

BABYMETAL uk flag

D : It’s a question I can’t answer to be honest. Haha! (wild)

Q : (laugh) So, what’s interesting about Babymetal for you? What’s the major difference from other metal and loud bands?

D : One of the best joys in life is to listen to something new. It should be not just a copy of existing music but fresh ones that surprise everyone. So Babymetal is exciting. The difference between them and other bands in metal scene is that everything they do is a series of joy and surprise. I watch them and think they are great.

Q : In Japan Babymetal is so popular enough to sell out arenas with over 10,000 audiences, but there’s a lot of controversial discussions about it’s metal or not metal. Do you think they are metal? If so, what do you think makes them metal?

D : Babymetal is not authentic metal. I think Babymetal is a hybrid of metal and Japanese Pop music. But they are heavy and enough metal, that makes metal fans enjoy it, including me. Personally it doesn’t matter to me whether Babymetal is metal or not. I can listen to Maiden or King Diamond or Carcass whenever I want some pure heavy metal. But sometimes you want to enjoy another things with more experimental and roguish taste, don’t you?

Q : I see. How about discussions in the UK about Babymetal is metal or not? And did it change after Babymetal’s appearance at Sonisphire and their solo show at the Forum?

D : As I said, there are many metalheads in the UK who don’t want to listen to Babymetal. But it’s not a problem at all! I think it’s not right to want acceptance from everyone because Babymetal is far from standard metal. But there must be a lot of people who find themselves enjoy Babymetal unexpectedly. I think it is just a proof of how good a concept of Babymetal was built.

Q : Then by seeing flat, what results did the Europa tour bring to Babymetal?

D : it’s a great success, I think. Because it had a lot of people change their previous impression on Babymetal. Their London live was sold out and everyone who I talked with said that they had an amazing night. Is it a most important thing, isn’t it?

Q : In Japan rock and metal media are rather negative to Babymetal and situation is like Hedoban fights alone. Hedoban thought “We can see the future of metal in Babymetal,” then issued special articles even insanely. What reactions are there from rock and metal media in the UK?

D : I think Metal Hammer is only medium in the UK that really supports Babymetal though some other magazines covered them and wrote positive articles. I think the more underground and extreme these media is, the less they mention about them. But we knew it in advance!

Q : The UK is a mother of metal and people have keen eyes and ears on metal, I believe. How do you think about metalheads in the UK?

D : UK people have an open mind to accept new things in general, and want to make a decision by watching and listening by themselves. So it never happens that everyone has the same opinion. And it’s boring if it happened. But UK metal community is powerful and passionate.

Q : Babymetal is going to come to London in next November. What live do you expect at Brixton Academy?

D : Needless to say I want eye-opening gorgeousness and unbelievable joy!

Q : How much popularity in the UK do you think Babymetal get on future? Do they go farther to O2 Arena?

D : The possibility is high, I think. To become as big enough to be a headliner at O2 Arena, Babymetal needs to bring in both mainstream Pop audiences and metalheads. But it must be possible.

Q : At last, Babymetal is going to play a solo live at an arena for over 20,000 audiences in next January. We want you to be there if you can! Metalheads in Japan who love Babymetal will welcome you!

D : I want to go to Japan because I want to see Babymetal. But I need someone who gives me my expense to Japan! (laugh)

Above is his review of BABYMETAL, the debut album.

Dom Lawson interview with Hedoban magazine (vol. 5)

The man who runs column on a major paper The Guardian, who is one of main writers of one of the top metal magazines Metal Hammer and who recognized Babymetal earliest and highest in the UK, finally came to Hedoban which pushes Babymetal as hard as can in Japan!

Dom Lawson
Dom Lawson

He was interviewed with Japanese metal magazine Hedoban before the second UK live at O2 Academy and its translation as follows:

Q : First, please tell us your metal experience as a listener and metal fan.

D : I spend almost of my life with listening to metal! Metal has taken my heart since I knew Iron Maiden, Motorhead and Twisted Sisters at ten years old. I devoted to thrash metal in my teenage years, and have listened to all sub genres of extreme metal from death metal to grind core to black metal, and underground music. I also like commercial and modern ones, but my true passion wants traditional metal and its descendants. I have listened to music of countless genres since then, my passion for metal is beyond ones for other genres. And I feel myself belong to it. Now I got a job to write about metal and drown in music with best circumstances. It’s so great!

Q : I went to see performance at Sonisphire and solo show at The Forum, I was surprised by an amount of metalheads there even more than those in Japan. Especially audiences in a solo show at The Forum was unexpectedly hyped, and it was one of the best hype of all. What in Babymetal do you think moved metalheads in UK?

D : Really? The impression might not be 100% precise. To be honest I was surprised to the fact that Babymetal got a big applause at Sonisphire. UK metal fans are so varied so we don’t tell what goes big and what not. But it was true that their appearance in Sonisphire this time gained tons of recognition all of a sudden. Fans who saw their stage got to know that Kami Band was real metallers and have superb talent. Also passionate performance of the trio of Babymetal had enough power of conviction. A power of making audiences enjoy flourished from the stage and it affected on the audiences. Yes, some somber and difficult audiences must have disliked a concept of Babymetal. But they react like that to anything.

Q : Have you ever had a interest in any Japanese metal band before Babymetal came to you?

D : I’m a big fan of Sigh and Church of Misery. And I like Boredoms, Ruins, Melt-Banana, Zeni Geva and more. Japanese bands give me an impression that they add new and a little crazy interpretation into established ideas on music. It makes music more fun and exotic for eastern listeners including me.

Q : In Japan die-hard Iron Maiden fans are recognized to be a high ranked metal fan and called as Gachi Metarā (true metalheads). And it is true that many in these Gachi Metarā never admit so-called perverted metal. What do you think of that, as one of die-hard Iron Maiden fans?

D : Yes, there are a lot of traditional metal fans in the UK, and they don’t accept anything but conservative and authentic metal sound. Fans of Maiden might support these narrow mindedness in a sense. But most of metal fans in the UK have an open mind about music. It would be because the UK is a major market and we have opportunities to listen to all bands, all kinds of music in the world. So there would be a lot of Maiden fans who also love Babymetal because it’s new, different a little and enjoying music, isn’t it? Not everyone listen to the music all the time along with a rule of what metal should be.

Q : Changing the subject, when and how was your first encounter with Babymetal?

D : Same as the many people I suppose, at first I knew Babymetal from a link which someone posted on Twitter. I clicked the link and watched a video, then I became a fan in a moment.

Q : Which song was it that you listened first?

D : I’m not 100% sure, but I think Megitsune was my first experience. I liked it in a moment. It’s enough heavy to me as a metalhead, its Pop aspect was also good. Good quality Pop music does no harm at all.

Q : So, which is your favorite Babymetal song?

D : I have two, Iine! and Ijime, Dame, Zettai. Iine! is crazy about mixture of different styles of music and has fine composition. Ijime, Dame, Zettai is a gorgeous epic metal song with killer melody!

Q : Hedoban thinks that Babymetal the first album is something that will become one of the best metal albums. What do you think of this album?

D : I think it’s a great album, too. All songs in it are powerful, also performance and production are first class. On top of that, it’s completely different from any other existing songs around us. I feel so refreshed by listening to it. I listen to it many times and my 11 years old daughter says she loves the album.

Q : Was Sonisphire your first time to see them live? I think it sounded different from sound sources or videos…?

D : I have seen Babymetal only at Sonisphire. I think the performance was minimum version of their full lives that they always do in Japan, even so it was the performance that exceeded my expectation enough. It was unexpectedly fun from the beginning to end!

Q : Then, which is your favorite member of Babymetal?

BABYMETAL uk flag

D : It’s a question I can’t answer to be honest. Haha! (wild)

Q : (laugh) So, what’s interesting about Babymetal for you? What’s the major difference from other metal and loud bands?

D : One of the best joys in life is to listen to something new. It should be not just a copy of existing music but fresh ones that surprise everyone. So Babymetal is exciting. The difference between them and other bands in metal scene is that everything they do is a series of joy and surprise. I watch them and think they are great.

Q : In Japan Babymetal is so popular enough to sell out arenas with over 10,000 audiences, but there’s a lot of controversial discussions about it’s metal or not metal. Do you think they are metal? If so, what do you think makes them metal?

D : Babymetal is not authentic metal. I think Babymetal is a hybrid of metal and Japanese Pop music. But they are heavy and enough metal, that makes metal fans enjoy it, including me. Personally it doesn’t matter to me whether Babymetal is metal or not. I can listen to Maiden or King Diamond or Carcass whenever I want some pure heavy metal. But sometimes you want to enjoy another things with more experimental and roguish taste, don’t you?

Q : I see. How about discussions in the UK about Babymetal is metal or not? And did it change after Babymetal’s appearance at Sonisphire and their solo show at the Forum?

D : As I said, there are many metalheads in the UK who don’t want to listen to Babymetal. But it’s not a problem at all! I think it’s not right to want acceptance from everyone because Babymetal is far from standard metal. But there must be a lot of people who find themselves enjoy Babymetal unexpectedly. I think it is just a proof of how good a concept of Babymetal was built.

Q : Then by seeing flat, what results did the Europa tour bring to Babymetal?

D : it’s a great success, I think. Because it had a lot of people change their previous impression on Babymetal. Their London live was sold out and everyone who I talked with said that they had an amazing night. Is it a most important thing, isn’t it?

Q : In Japan rock and metal media are rather negative to Babymetal and situation is like Hedoban fights alone. Hedoban thought “We can see the future of metal in Babymetal,” then issued special articles even insanely. What reactions are there from rock and metal media in the UK?

D : I think Metal Hammer is only medium in the UK that really supports Babymetal though some other magazines covered them and wrote positive articles. I think the more underground and extreme these media is, the less they mention about them. But we knew it in advance!

Q : The UK is a mother of metal and people have keen eyes and ears on metal, I believe. How do you think about metalheads in the UK?

D : UK people have an open mind to accept new things in general, and want to make a decision by watching and listening by themselves. So it never happens that everyone has the same opinion. And it’s boring if it happened. But UK metal community is powerful and passionate.

Q : Babymetal is going to come to London in next November. What live do you expect at Brixton Academy?

D : Needless to say I want eye-opening gorgeousness and unbelievable joy!

Q : How much popularity in the UK do you think Babymetal get on future? Do they go farther to O2 Arena?

D : The possibility is high, I think. To become as big enough to be a headliner at O2 Arena, Babymetal needs to bring in both mainstream Pop audiences and metalheads. But it must be possible.

Q : At last, Babymetal is going to play a solo live at an arena for over 20,000 audiences in next January. We want you to be there if you can! Metalheads in Japan who love Babymetal will welcome you!

D : I want to go to Japan because I want to see Babymetal. But I need someone who gives me my expense to Japan! (laugh)

Above is his review of BABYMETAL, the debut album.

Kami Band who’s who – Another god of guitar, drum and programmer

Kami Band is a back band for BABYMETAL – its member is a god (Kami) of music summoned by The Fox God stage by stage. All the Kamis might have their own jobs.

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So members are not fixed. In the previous article, this site explained Takayoshi Ohmura (guitar), Leda (guitar), BOH (bass) and Aoyama Hideki (drum) before. But other Kamis are on board. Let me explain Mikio Fujioka (guitar), Yuya Maeta (drum) and Hidefumi Usami (program)!

Mikio Fujioka – god of guitar

Some fans call him as Ko-gami (a small god) in Japanese with friendly feelings, compared to Ohmura Takayoshi as Oh-gami (a tall god). We can see his boyish outfit in a lot of his lecture books, columns on popular guitar magazine Young Guitar, also in videos of his plays. He’s a fulltime lecturer of a music school MI Japan which a guitar maker ESP runs. He’s rather a jazz and fusion player but plays all genres excellently. He was a student of it and became a lecturer right after he graduated. The Next video shows his various and skillful plays with Babymetal, in some other bands and other performances.

As a god of guitar, he appeared less than other guitarists Leda and Ohmura. So he is like a god of gods of guitar. It is true in a way because he taught Ohmura at the school. (By the way the rest Leda was also from the school.) He was first summoned at Inazuma Rock Festival 2013, and next appearance was BABYMETAL WORLD TOUR in this summer in France, German and the UK including Sonisphere festival. He saved Leda and the band on Sonisphere stage when Leda’s guitar had a trouble and took a few minutes for another one in the middle of the last song Ijime, Dame, Zettai.

Yuya Maeta – god of drum

doko_maeta

He was first summoned to BABYMETAL live in Japan on June 2014. And he played at the LA live and Lady Gaga support acts in this summer in the US, and the return tour in NYC and London. He was a support drummer for Blue Man Group and began to play with Marty Friedman Band from this summer. The following video is Headbangya!! with him in NYC live.

Hidefumi Usami – god of program

He is a programmer, arranger and also a composer who worked with Gospelers and other singers and bands. He was first summoned for BABYMETAL Japan tour on this June and has supported all of their live performances since then.

Kami Band who’s who – Another god of guitar, drum and programmer

Kami Band is a back band for BABYMETAL – its member is a god (Kami) of music summoned by The Fox God stage by stage. All the Kamis might have their own jobs.

1921145_10202540270581288_1614117966_o

So members are not fixed. In the previous article, this site explained Takayoshi Ohmura (guitar), Leda (guitar), BOH (bass) and Aoyama Hideki (drum) before. But other Kamis are on board. Let me explain Mikio Fujioka (guitar), Yuya Maeta (drum) and Hidefumi Usami (program)!

Mikio Fujioka – god of guitar

Some fans call him as Ko-gami (a small god) in Japanese with friendly feelings, compared to Ohmura Takayoshi as Oh-gami (a tall god). We can see his boyish outfit in a lot of his lecture books, columns on popular guitar magazine Young Guitar, also in videos of his plays. He’s a fulltime lecturer of a music school MI Japan which a guitar maker ESP runs. He’s rather a jazz and fusion player but plays all genres excellently. He was a student of it and became a lecturer right after he graduated. The Next video shows his various and skillful plays with Babymetal, in some other bands and other performances.

As a god of guitar, he appeared less than other guitarists Leda and Ohmura. So he is like a god of gods of guitar. It is true in a way because he taught Ohmura at the school. (By the way the rest Leda was also from the school.) He was first summoned at Inazuma Rock Festival 2013, and next appearance was BABYMETAL WORLD TOUR in this summer in France, German and the UK including Sonisphere festival. He saved Leda and the band on Sonisphere stage when Leda’s guitar had a trouble and took a few minutes for another one in the middle of the last song Ijime, Dame, Zettai.

Yuya Maeta – god of drum

doko_maeta

He was first summoned to BABYMETAL live in Japan on June 2014. And he played at the LA live and Lady Gaga support acts in this summer in the US, and the return tour in NYC and London. He was a support drummer for Blue Man Group and began to play with Marty Friedman Band from this summer. The following video is Headbangya!! with him in NYC live.

Hidefumi Usami – god of program

He is a programmer, arranger and also a composer who worked with Gospelers and other singers and bands. He was first summoned for BABYMETAL Japan tour on this June and has supported all of their live performances since then.

Five moments that differentiated BABYMETAL as what it is today

Prologue: To the Metal Resistance

Many reactions, reviews and news have been issued about BABYMETAL. Many of those referred to their forming as an Idol unit, their ignorance of Heavy Metal before the beginning, their going viral with Gimme Chocolate MV, and their successful performance at a main stage of Sonisphere festival.

But how many people know what happened between these moments? Everything has a chain of cause-and-result cycles. The same does to BABYMETAL. Here reviews a series of five critical moments from its birth to date that became causes/results made them what they are now.

1. Kobametal the producer found the way to shine Suzuka Nakamoto aka Su-metal, the talented lead vocalist most

Suzuka Nakamoto has been in show biz over 10 years even she’s 16 now. She’s said to have been always recognized as special talent and had already proved her powerful and distinctive voice and live performance skill when she was ten as a member of Karen Girl’s, one-year-only idol group act. They fired up an arena with 10,000 audiences by their performance. When the group disbanded as planned in 2009, her bright future was promised as an idol singer in Japan.

Doko_prelude_01

But her voice and dance was just out of standard from Japanese idol, even too powerful and straight. The fact that her office Amuse didn’t promote her like that was the proof of it. Here was the one who worked at the office. His name was Key Kobayashi – future Kobametal the producer.

Key was decades-long fan of Heavy Metal, had experience on PR and an administrative job of some rock bands back then. He thought carefully about the best way for Suzuka to make full potential of her unique talent of singing and dancing out to the world. He saw her as a limitless type of performer. She said by herself that she didn’t remember anything when she’s in the zone on stage. And everyone saw her hit unexpected quality in singing and dancing.

An idea finally hit the man that a speed and loudness of Heavy Metal was the answer that could bring chemistry with Suzuka’s full power. At the same time he went to Lollapalooza festival in Chicago, US to see Japanese Metal band X Japan performing. He saw many people there finally jumping around here and there along with its Japanese-lyrics song with their X-shaped arms high up to the sky, even hard-looking reggae guy.

He felt confident in these jumping clouds that Japanese heavy music could transcend a border of languages, nationalities and music preferences to touch and move people who even didn’t understand Japanese at all.
So he was sure he could make it by blending two powerful weapons together – one was Suzuka Nakamoto the quality-proven performer and the other was heavy music, his lifetime devotion and profession.

2. BABYMETAL was formed with twins-like enchanting girls Yui Mizuno and Moa Kikuchi with Suzuka

Suzuka was a powerful asset but she’s so distinctive by any means. Also in Japan a solo idol became out of fashion. So he thought to add partners to her but at the same time standard girls’ group format didn’t seem to work. In the recruiting period, he wanted a feel of little twins dancing around of Suzuka like former famous twins idol The Peanuts signing for Mothra, and finally Yui and Moa caught his eye.

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Both of them were eleven years old, almost identical outfit like twins also had years of experience of CMs, fashion shows and stages at the time. The miracle was that those twins-like two girls were in the same office along with Suzuka. The two are becoming less identical now but they kept almost identical like twins in years.
Both of them easily cleared average qualities in performing, but each of them have different strong points. Yui is good at dancing and more modest and Moa is good at charming and communicative type. And Suzuka is also well known as gno-brainerh type of person at her own pace. They are capable also professional, synchronized also complementary like a stable triangle.

3. BABYMETAL came with a unique and quality coupling of Heavy Metal sound, J-pop melody, dynamic dance and Idol appearance by their debut song Doki Doki Morning

Doki Doki Morning was released on 2011/10/24 from Juuonbu Records label that was just built for BABYMETAL only. Juuonbu means a heavy music club that is a name of a subsidiary of Sakura Gakuin that is an idol academy in their office, Amuse Inc. The song is catchy J-Pop number with cute choreography of three little girls, but once you listen to its instrumental version you’ll find how heavy its sound really is. It uses some of PANTERA drum sounds (how many other girls’ groups use sounds from PANTERA?)

1a110300

It didn’t become a big hit but it could make BABYMETAL survive, and it set the tone of its sound since then – brutality of Heavy Metal and catchiness of J-Music with complexity of Idol song. Japanese Idol song is even chaotic. It can allow almost anything under the name of Kawaii girls. Many music talents from other genres have come to the genre and create vast range of songs, and it became like a meta-genre that holds a lot of genres underneath because it would be said that music industry has been shrunken much in Japan and Idol is now the only genre that generates enough sales to be able to sustain Japanese music industry.

In fact, there have been a lot of songs of Idols with heavy taste and Heavy Metal bands with cute girls in Japan. But the genius of Key and greatness of the girls are that they never accept BABYMETAL to stay just a taste but challenge to be a real thing. Their Heavy Metal sound is real. So is their Pop melody, choreography, Idol charisma, Suzuka’s voice and Yui and Moa’s cuteness, too. That makes the difference. You can tell by yourselves and those who came to see them live left their comments that even metalheads in decades really enjoyed their performance, held their breaths away by Su-metal’s voice and melt their hearts by Yui and Moa’s cuteness. And to our surprise their performances seem to keep improving from comments and reviews.

4. BABYMETAL made a successful first appearance to a big rock festival, Summer Sonic with the youngest performer record

Summer Sonic is a big rock festival in Japan with a long history since 2000 which now hosts over 120,000 audiences in two days. Its headliners were big names like Green Day, Marilyn Manson, Guns N’ Roses, Oasis, Linkin Park, Metallica, Stevie Wonder and more.
BABYMETAL appeared there in 2012 by invitation from its host which saw BABYMETAL as something new with potential though they had only 5 songs, released only 3 singles and no album and little appearance on TV and magazine back then. They played at sub stage rather small. But it was their first exposure to many non-Idol fans, musicians and persons in music industry and media of broader music genres.

original1

The band got into the second level from the performance. They didn’t play at small event space anymore, held first solo live with 1,300 audiences and did first performance abroad in Singapore. And these lead them to their major debut and to their back band, Kami Band.

5. BABYMETAL acquired authentic Heavy Metal feel with their major debut song Ijime, Dame, Zettai and introduced Kami Band as a back band in their live

And early in 2013 their major debut came with Ijime, Dame, Zettai. It was actually their second song, but it was their fourth single. It might be that Kobametal kept waiting for the release until the time came. It was a straight and strong power metal number with well-structured melody line that could maximize power of Su-metal’s power with impressive shredding guitar solo and endless twin bass drum roams.

Kobametal said that he “thought it’s time for a fast ball hard enough to surprise metalheads,” and they won the bet. He “finally got some credit to talk with metalheads,” and it earned “pretty good sales figure. The CD sales kept its moment long in the front of stores.”

And at the same time, he made a decision to introduce live back band into their stage performances. BABYMETAL had played with pre-recorded track till the period. Despite of financial and temporal cost, the back band could improve their live performance a lot. And it needs mentioning to the quality of these band players.

Doko_prelude_07

It’s named as Kami Band. Kami is a word that refers to god. All the member deserve the name because every one of them is regarded as top notch musician in Japan. But why these best of the best join to this three-piece idol girls’ unit? They are the ones who never be pressed for good offers. More money? Maybe. A pressure of big music agency? Maybe.
But some of them said playing in BABYMETAL behind of these hard-working talented girls and trying different types of well-produced music are just so much fun also challenging. Also they said they felt confident that BABYMETAL was going to be something before it became as it is now. They even said these girls were so professional enough to respect as a musician. They are all top notch performers. Both the girls and the band. And here would be chemistry between them. So is there any reason that BABYMETAL is NOT going to be a real thing in the world?

Epilogue: The Metal Resistance is going on

So these are critical moments that BABYMETAL has had until it became the Internet viral with Gimme Chocolate. Maybe many of you know what happened after the song. And I want to say. The song IS – or was – viral. It is watched over 17,000,000 times from last April on YouTube. Some said it’s another WTF thing from Japan. Yes it’s very different from American or Europian Pop, Heavy Metal or any other music. It might have surprised tons of people in the world in various senses.

BABYMETAL-at-HEAVY-MONTREAL

But is BABYMETAL itself just a viral in the Internet? Three months later when BABYMETAL appeared into curios eyes from 60,000 people and left from a main stage of Sonisphere with great amount of applause under the opening-up UK sky on July 5, audiences there and so many other people in the world who watched it via YouTube later would have felt that BABYMETAL was something in the real world. Or anything different with potential to the future.
Now they just closed the Metal Resistance Episode II with live performances in Japan, Germany, France, UK and US. Audiences and media people from various countries felt their performance live by their own eyes, ears and hearts. They must have felt BABYMETAL was not another WTF from Japan but something new that can deliver quality experiences that  can trancend borders of languages, nationalities and music preferences to touch and move people who even didn’t understand Japanese at all. And BABYMETAL declared the beginning of Metal Resistance Episode III from O2 Academy, Brixton in UK.
We don’t know what it is yet. But whatever it will be we already know this will come next year with quality. It will come. We will see it before long.

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Rumor of the Internet : BABYMETAL, DragonForce and Attack on Titan collaboration

The moment BABYMETAL played the bland-new song «The One», a rumor started to fly over the Internet. It says that the song indecates future collaboration of BABYMETAL with Attack on Titan, an Anime which went to the Internet phenomena last year.

Nothing has been confirmed at the point, but what makes people talking about the rumor? I am going to pick up some “coincidences” said in the Internet.

1. Coincidence of riding a horse
In the biginning of the song, Su-metal, Yuimetal and Moametal do choreography of riding a horse running fast with whipping. And in Attack on Titan, horses are main carrier and main characters ride their horses.

Doko_AoT01

2. Coincidence of salute posing
In the middle of the song, the three girls do saluting pose with putting their right hands on their chest. In Attack on Titan, the same saluting is using a lot of times as a sign of royality and bravery to their army against titans.

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Doko_AoT03

3. Coincidence of motive and characteristics
From its early days BABYMETAL describes their lives and other activities as The Metal Resistance. They have a mission to save Heavy Metal and the world by introducing the new style of Heavy Metal. That mission started from nothing, has a lot of obstacles and difficulties. So it is called as resistance.
As for Attack on Titan, the story began from massive attack of titans with countless casualties, and almost no hope left with human race. The main characters faced a lot of obstacles and difficulties. The main character never give up and keep his heart burning, pushing him and his friends forward as he can.

The new song is a straight power metal number with shredding guitar and J-Rock melody. Lyrics of BABYMETAL brand-new song describes a resistance from solidarity to unity as one with keeping their inner fire burning up, overcoming obstacles and difficulties. In a word they have same storyline, motive and feeling.

4. Coincidence of release dates
The song had its debut last week. The first movie version of Attack on Titan is going to release next week in Japan. It is not likely to use the song in the movie as an image song with considering no official comment has done a week early of the release. But what if they would use the song as a secret collaboration BGM? All audience must be so hyped.
And the second Attack on Titan movie will come next year, furthemore a live-action version in two episodes is under production aiming to next year release. This new song would be a signal for future collaboration if it would not be this time.

5. Win-Win effect
BABYMETAL gets wide attention from this April with the Internet viral song Gimme Chocolate and got recognition from metalheads and little monsters through its first World Tour in France, UK, US and Canada including its performance on a main stage of Sonisphere, a big Metal festival  in UK and support acts for Lady Gaga’s US tour, artRAVE: The ARTPOP Ball. They would be able to get another big attention from new audience by a collaboration with movie business.
Also as for Attack on Titan, a collaboration with the Internet sensation would be able to get wider interests from non-Anime fans.

Some BABYMETAL fans are favorable about this rumor, others are not. Critical responses say such collaboration with Anime would ruin BABYMETAL’s core value as authentic “one and only” live unit that surprised the world by its quality of songs, voices, dances and sounds.

For the Dragonforce and BABYMETAL collaboration well, Herman Li have these on Facebook earlier this week.

I've been summoned by the Fox God along with Sam Totman of Dragonforce to join the Metal Resistance with BABYMETAL. 😉

Posted by Herman Li on Tuesday, November 11, 2014

So what do you think about that?

The brand new BABYMETAL song «The one» – lyrics romanization and translation

The brand new BABYMETAL song was played in their latest UK live at Brixton on 2014.11.8. It is a lyrics translation and romanization by dictation. It first appered on Reddit.

Warning: This is an old post dating from 2014. At that time a new «untitled» song was played at the Brixton Academy, to be titled: Road Of Resistance. Since that time, the real «The one» song has been released and the REAL lyrics can be find here:

BABYMETAL – The One (English Version) Lyrics

The One Audio 23,7 MB , aac 256 kbits , Password: Babymetal, Full Version with intro 13 mins 5 Seconds and the end speeches.

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Romanization:

Higashi no Sora wo Makka ni Someru
Noroshi no Hikari ga
Kodoku no Yami no Owari wo Tsugeru
Arata na Michi-shirube

Kujikete mo Nando demo
Kokoro no Hono-o Moyase

IT’S THE TIME, IT’S THE TIME
Ima Kono Shunkan wo
IT’S THE TIME, IT’S THE TIME
Tomo ni Ikiru

IT’S THE TIME, IT’S THE TIME
Ashita no Kimi ni Utauyo

Sa-a Toki ha Kita

RESISTANCE, RESISTANCE
Wow… Kokoro ha Hitotsu
Kimi ga Shinjiru nara
Susume, Michi Naki Michi demo

FOREVER, FOREVER
Wow… Kokoro no Oku ni Moeru Atsui HEART
Sore ga Bokura no RESISTANCE

(guitar solo) Wow oh oh oh… (guitar solo)

Inochi ga Tsuzuku Kagiri
Keshite Se wo Muketari wa Shinai
Kyou ga Ashita wo Tsukurun da
So, Bokura no Mirai ON THE WAY

RESISTANCE, RESISTANCE
SET UP A SHOUT, SHOUTING FOREVER
Kimi ga Shinjiru nara
Susume, Kotae ha Koko ni Aru

FOREVER, FOREVER
Woh… Kokoro no Oku ni Moeru Atsui HEART
Bokura no RESISTANCE

The one translation:

Light of the beacon that burns the eastern sky red
Tells the end of darkness of the isolation
(It’s) A new guide of our path forward

Every time you got breakdowns,
Burn your inner fire harder

It’s the time, it’s the time
For the very moment now
It’s the time, it’s the time
We are alive together

It’s the time, it’s the time
(I will) Sing for future you now
Yes, the time has come

Resistance Resistance
Wow… Our hearts are now united
If you belive it, go forward
Even if it’s a trackless road

Forever Forever
Wow… In the very deep of us
Our hearts are burning
It’s our resistance

(guitar solo) Wow oh oh oh… (guitar solo)

As long as we are alive
We never turn our back
Today will build tomorrow
And our future is on the way

Resistance Resistance
Set up a shout, shouting forever

If you belive it, go forward
The answer is there

Forever Forever
Wow… In the very deep of us
Our hearts are burning
It’s our resistance

Put your Kitsune up!
Aaaaaaa!