Catch Me If You Can English Translation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2c3MM3zf0Y

Catch Me If You Can

One, two, one, two, three, four.

[[Hey! Are you ready? Are you ready?]]
No, not yet.
[[Hey! Are you ready? Are you ready?]]
No, not yet.

That way? This way?
Hey, tagger, where do you think I am?
Never to be found,
I’ve found such a special place to hide.

[[Hey! Are you ready? Are you ready?]]
No, not yet.
[[Hey! Are you ready? Are you ready?]]
No, not yet.

To right and to left, I look around.
Oh, no. My heart can’t stop beating fast.
Alright. If you think you can find me,
go ahead and try it! Try it!

[[Hey! Are you ready? Are you ready?]]
No, not yet.
[[Hey! Are you ready? Are you ready?]]
No, not yet.

Hey, tagger, here I am. [Hey, tagger, here I am.]
Come toward my clapping! [Come toward my clapping!]
Hey, tagger, here I am.

Now I’m ready.

Wow wow… Round and round, hide-and-seek.
I run around. [voi!] I run around. [voi!]
Please mind your footing! [Hey, catch me!]

Wow wow… Round and round, hide-and-seek.
Red shoes, [Yes!] you shouldn’t wear. [Non!]
Because they are dangerous.

[[???voi??? Aren’t here any crybabies?]]
[[???voi??? Aren’t here any naughty kids?]]

Hey, tagger, here I am. [Hey, tagger, here I am.]
Come toward my clapping! [Come toward my clapping!]
Hey, tagger, here I am.

[[I’ve found you.]]

Wow wow… Round and round, hide-and-seek.
Hey, red ogre, [voi!] hey, blue ogre, [voi!]
take your steps! [one, two, one, two.]

Wow wow… Round and round, hide-and-seek.
Even if you fall over, [Yes!] you shouldn’t cry. [Non!]
Because you are strong kids.

We are going still more.

Wow wow… Round and round, hide-and-seek.

Wow wow… Round and round, hide-and-seek.
Red shoes, you shouldn’t wear.
Because they are dangerous.

No, not yet.
No, not yet.

About Kakurenbo and Onigokko
Both are children’s games. Kakurenbo is a kind of hide-and-seek and onigokko is a kind of tag. Both the seeker of seek-and-hide and the tagger of tag are called “oni” (=ogre) in Japan.

In kakurenbo, oni counts up to a certain number while others hide. At reaching the number, oni calls “Moo ii kai?” (=Are you alright now?). Those who are not ready respond “Maada da yo.”(=not yet), those ready respond “Moo ii yo.” (=alright now). If someone responds “not yet”, oni calls again after a while, and when no one responds “not yet”, oni starts to seek. And when oni finds one of the hiders, oni calls “(hider’s name) miitsuketa.” (=I’ve found ***). There are some variations for ending of the game.

There are the melodies sung for these calls. Those of “maada da yo” and “moo ii yo” are sung in this song, “moo ii kai?” is like “moo ii yo”, and “miitsuketa” is like “maada da yo”. But these melodies are slightly different in regions.

Since this lyric contains the words used for onigokko (e.g. catch me), I think the game as a mixture of kakurenbo and onigokko (=kakure-onigokko), and I translate “oni” to “tagger”. In onigokko, when oni touches someone, that one then becomes oni.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R497taEy28k

About Oni
“Oni” is the name of ogre-like monster. Though oni are as cruel as ogres, the Japanese think they may have humanlike minds and hearts. Some legendary oni were brought up as human children, but excluded because of their supernatural-ness, and then became oni.

Unnecessary addition: There is a famous fairy tale titled “Naita Aka-oni” (Red ogre cried). A kind-hearted Red ogre wanted to be a friend of humans, but people didn’t believe him, so his friend Blue ogre proposed a plot: Blue would attack the village and Red would defend them. Red declined but Blue attacked. Red defended and then became a friend of the people. A few days later, Red found a message on the door of Blue’s house: “Farewell, My Friend. I leave here so that the plot will not be exposed to the people”. Reading this, Red ogre cried.