Author: Du Enki

META! Meta Tarô

Released on 2016 Apr. 1st, included in “METAL RESISTANCE”.
Lyric: KxBxMETAL, RYUMETAL / Music: RYUMETAL / Arr.: tatsuo, RYUMETAL

META! Meta Tarô

Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, you are the hero.
With the Metal heart, you’re going to be reborn.
Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, together boys and girls.
He’s everybody’s hero, META! Meta Taroh!

[[M! E! T! A!]]

Long ago, long long ago, far away,
in a clear planet in the galaxy, he was born.
It’s the period of war.  Winners enjoy Heaven.
We always lose and our life is hell.
Now we will say farewell to those days.
Now let’s stand up!

Can you hear the voice from inside of you?
Can you hear the voices of your comrades?

  [[Hit it away, Meta Taroh!]]

Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, you are the hero.
With the Metal power, you’re going to be reborn.
Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, together boys and girls.
He’s everybody’s hero, META! Meta Taroh!

[[M! E! T! A!]]

  [Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, Metata, Metata, Meta Taroh.
   Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, Metata, Metata, Meta Taroh.
   Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, Metata, Metata, Meta Taroh.
   Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, Metata, Meta…]

Can you hear the voices of your comrades?
Call the hero up from your heart!

Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, you’re the Metal hero.
If Metal music sounds, we are friends.
Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, together boys and girls.
Everybody, let’s sing together! META! Meta Taroh!
He’s everybody’s hero, Meta Taroh.


  ROMAJI LYRIC AND NOTES ARE BELOW.

[i] About Meta Tarô & Ultraman Tarô

Some lyrics of this song seem to have references to “Ultraman” series, Japanese SFX TV drama series of giant heroes. “Ultraman Tarô” is the 5th series broadcast in 1973.

Ultra Family live in “Hikari no Kuni” (= Country of Light), a planet 300 million light-years away. Ultra Brothers are about 10000-20000 year old. Some Ultramen disguise themselves as human and other Ultramen have merged with some human to revive him/her. There are also Ultramen who had been human and became Ultraman. Anyway, on this Earth, an Ultraman lives as human in peacetime and changes into Ultraman when a crisis comes.

Throughout all series, in some episodes, obvious invaders appear, but in other episodes, monsters (= kaijû; lit. strange beasts) are something like a bear or an elephant straying into a village. In some episodes, Ultramen try to drive them away alive.

“太郎” (tarô) or “○太郎” (xxxtarô) is a traditional popular male name in Japan (usually given to the first-born son). Ultraman Tarô was popular to elementary schoolboys, but I feel this song is rather like the theme song of Anpanman who is a hero popular to much younger kids.

META! Meta Tarô

Romaji Lyric English Translation Notes
 
Meta Taroo Meta Taroo kimi wa hiiroo saa. Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, you are the hero.
Metaru no haato de umare-kawaru no saa. With the Metal heart, you’re going to be reborn. 1
Meta Taroo Meta Taroo
    TOGETHER BOYS AND GIRLS.
Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, together boys and girls.
Minna no hiiroo META! Meta Taroo! He’s everybody’s hero, META! Meta Taroh! 2
 
[[M! E! T! A!]] [[M! E! T! A!]]
 
Zutto mukashi motto mukashi haruka kanata Long ago, long long ago, far away, [i],Y
ginga-kei no sunda hoshi de umare mashita. in a clear planet in the galaxy, he was born. [i],M
Toki wa sengoku. Kateba tengoku. It’s the period of war.  Winners enjoy heaven. 3,4,S
Make-ppanashi na bokura wa jigoku. We always lose and our life is hell. MY
Sonna hibi wa koko de sarabai. Now we will say farewell to those days. 5,S
Saa tachiagaroo yo! Now let’s stand up!
 
Kimi ni kikoete iru ka? kokoro no koe? Can you hear the voice from inside of you? 6,S
Kimi ni todoite iru ka? nakama no koe? Can you hear the voices of your comrades? 6,S
 
  [[Buttobase Meta Taroo!]]   [[Hit it away, Meta Taroh!]] 7
 
Meta Taroo Meta Taroo kimi wa hiiroo saa. Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, you are the hero.
Metaru no pawaa de umare-kawaru no saa. With the Metal power, you’re going to be reborn. 1
Meta Taroo Meta Taroo
    TOGETHER BOYS AND GIRLS.
Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, together boys and girls.
Minna no hiiroo META! Meta Taroo! He’s everybody’s hero, META! Meta Taroh!
 
[[M! E! T! A!]] [[M! E! T! A!]]
 
  [Meta Taroo Meta Taroo
      Metata Metata Meta Taro
  [Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh,
      Metata, Metata, Meta Taroh.
8,MY
   Meta Taroo Meta Taroo
      Metata Metata Meta Taro
   Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh,
      Metata, Metata, Meta Taroh.
MY
   Meta Taroo Meta Taroo
      Metata Metata Meta Taro
   Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh,
      Metata, Metata, Meta Taroh.
MY
   Meta Taroo Meta Taroo
      Metata Meta…]
   Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh,
      Metata, Meta…]
MY
 
Kimi ni todoite iru ka? nakama no koe? Can you hear the voices of your comrades? S
Kimi no kokoro no hiiroo yobidase! Call the hero up from your heart! 1,S
 
Meta Taroo Meta Taroo metaru hiiroo saa. Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, you’re the Metal hero. 9
Metaru ga hibikeba bokura wa tomodachi sa. If Metal music sounds, we are friends.
Meta Taroo Meta Taroo
    TOGETHER BOYS AND GIRLS.
Meta Taroh, Meta Taroh, together boys and girls.
Minna de utaoo! META! Meta Taroo! Everybody, let’s sing together! META! Meta Taroh!
Minna no hiiroo Meta Taroo! He’s everybody’s hero, Meta Taroh!
 

Notes

  1. The line marked with “Y” is sung by YUIMETAL, and “M” by MOAMETAL, and “S” by SU-METAL. Other lines (without brackets) are sung by all three members together. (Revised on 2017 Jan. 20.)
  2. In Ultraman series (see note [i]), an ordinary person is reborn to be an Ultraman in the first episode, and he/she changes into Ultraman in every episode. I’m not sure which change these lines refer to. (Added on 2016 Apr. 15.)
        In most hero’s theme songs, such a rebirth is mentioned in the perfect form “umare-kawatta” and such a change in every episode is called “henshin”. The original lines have only the present form “umare-kawaru” and an emphasizing phrase “no sa”.
  3. Grammatically, there is/are only one/two noun clause/phrases: “Meta Taroh” (who is) “everybody’s hero”.
  4. “Sengoku” means Warring States (period). It refers to around 4th & 3rd centuries BCE of China or around 16th century of Japan, when the central government had lost control and the local lords battled each other to expand their territories.
  5. There is a saying “kateba tengoku makereba jigoku” which means “if one wins, (one’s life shall be like) heaven, if one loses, (one’s life shall be like) hell”.
  6. “Sarabai” is the union of “saraba” & “bye-bye”. The origin of this word seems to be “Sayonara March” (1984), the ending theme of a TV program for little children. Both “saraba” & “sayonara” mean “good-bye” or “farewell”.
  7. Grammatically, “koe” (= voice(s) ) is the grammatical subject in both sentences: “Has the voice … been heard by you?” and “Have the voices … reached to you?”
  8. “Buttobase Meta Taroo!” is a parody of “Kattobase (person’s name)!” (as Unknown san commented on 2016 Apr. 12). This is yelled out to cheer up the batter in a baseball game in Japan. Here “buttobase” may mean “hit the enemy away”, but SU-METAL posed like a batter in the Wembley concert.
        Both “kat” and “but” are prefixes and “tobasu” (tobase) means “to make something fly”. “Kattobasu” sounds somewhat refreshing and is used for smashing a clean hit, driving on a seaside road, etc. while “buttobasu” sounds somewhat heavily and is used for hitting a man away, etc.
  9. I’m sorry for having missed these whispers for a long time (added on 2017 Mar. 31).
  10. There is no grammatical subject, but I complement the sentence with “you” adjusting it to the corresponding lines above.

Continue readingMETA! Meta Tarô

META! Meta Tarô

This page is under construction. This rush translation with typos is to be soon revised.Released on 2016 Apr. 1st, included in “METAL RESISTANCE”Lyric: KxBxMETAL, RYUMETAL / Music: RYUMETAL / Arr.: tatsuo, RYUMETAL META! Meta Tarô Romaji LyricEng… … Continue readingMETA! Meta Tarô

Sis. Anger

Released on 2016 Apr. 1st, included in “METAL RESISTANCE”
Lyric: TSUBOMETAL, TMETAL / Music: TSUBOMETAL / Arr.: YUPPEMETAL

This song is sung by BLACK BABYMETAL (MOAMETAL & YUIMETAL).

Sis. Anger

I dislike
guys who think only about themselves.
You’re uncool, super uncool.
Don’t approach me!

I dislike
“impossible”, “useless”, “it’s reached the limit”.
They’re uncool, super uncool.
I don’t wanna hear them.

I will knock your ill-nature into shape.
Burn! Burn your anger hidden inside!

“Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
It doesn’t matter to win or lose.
“Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
It is only to be serious or not that matters.

I dislike! dislike! dislike! dislike!
Fighting spirit! spirit! spirit! spirit!
You, stupid guy!

I dislike
guys who are not serious but only make excuses.
Stop kidding! I got super irritated.
Don’t turn your dirty face to me!

I dislike
guys who can’t do it but pretend to be tough.
Stop kidding! I got really irritated.
Get out of my sight!

I will knock your ill-nature into shape.
I will burn up everything with flare of anger.

“Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
It doesn’t matter to be skillful or awkward.
“Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
You may think back but may not regret.

Fight! Fight against sneaking temptation!
Fight! Fight! Shout out your anger!

“Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
You say “sorry”? You say “forgive me”? What do I do with you?
“Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
It’s a lie? Flattery? Ready for anything! Bring it on!


  ROMAJI LYRIC AND NOTES ARE BELOW.

[i] About Japanese Abusive Words

As noted below, the original lyric contains many vulgar words, but most of them are lazy or rough pronunciations which are usually regarded as rude (note #4, #6, #9; revised on 2016 May 9, thanks to Anonymous sans on 2016 May 1&7) or somewhat rude synonyms (like “guy”? note #3, #10, #11, #18) or purely provoking words without dirty nuances (note #13, #23, #24). Only “baka yarô” (note #15, #16) are special words to insult someone.

There are dirty Japanese words to insult someone such as “k_s_” which corresponds to “sh_t” and an Osaka dialect “itemau” which corresponds to “f__k (you)”, but such Japanese words are not used in this song, so I don’t use such English words. I think dirty words should be reserved for dirty words.

“Zakkenja nê” is a strong expression, but it is just a variant pronunciation of “fuzakeru no de wa nai” (= fuzakeru na) which has no dirty nuance, so I have no idea but translating it to “stop kidding”. I’m sorry for not knowing English well. This word sounds not so strong to people who know the Japanese dialects which have special abusive words, but I don’t know whether Tokyô people use this word because they are less offensive than people in those regions or because their abusive vocabulary is poor while they are as offensive as those people.

Some fans wonder why (Amuse let) BLACK BABYMETAL sing these somewhat offensive lyrics, and some fans seem to dislike such lyrics. But this song is fictional. The lyrics are not what they really want to say. And I think the words are somewhat deliberately selected just like a criminal heroine in a Japanese movie is usually depicted so as not to lose our sympathy.

[ii] Does she want to refuse or improve these guys?

This song has some lines that say as if she refuses these guys, which I mark with (ii) below. Some other lines say as if she wants to improve these guys, which I mark with [ii], and some lines sound like the words of rock & roll preachers or something, which I mark with {ii}.

If one tries to improve those whom one dislikes, there should be some reason why one doesn’t simply try to drive them away. Of course, one doesn’t necessarily have goodwill towards them though improving them. A wise dictator knows brainwashing is more profitable to him than bloody purge. If “Sis.” (= sister) of the title means that a girl dislikes her brother(s), she can’t easily desert him/them even though she dislike him/them very much.

I pay attention to the line “I will beat your ill-nature into shape”. Some teachers or something do this mainly for their self-realization (i.e. the guys are mere materials for their work), but I don’t think this song is sung by such a kind of person, so I incline to think she wants to rescue the guys from such a state of being ill-nature because she has some goodwill towards them though she uses harsh words. (Unnecessary addition: I want to call this ‘goodwill with harsh words’ “ツンデレ” (tsundere), but it seems to be confusing because the word originally refers to a girl who is usually unfriendly (= tsun) but gets over-friendly (= dere) to her lover once she’s fallen in love.)

In some interviews, Miss Moa said like “I hope ‘Sis. Anger’ would encourage many people.” and Miss Yui said like “This song made me stand up straight when I sang it, so I hope it can motivate the listeners even a little”.

Sis. Anger

 

Romaji Lyric English Translation Notes
  1
Kirai daa, I dislike 2
jibun no koto shika kangae-nai yatsu. guys who think only about themselves. 3
Kakko warii choo kakko warii kara You’re uncool, super uncool. 4,5
chikazuite kunna! Don’t approach me! 6,(ii)
 
Kirai daa, I dislike
muri toka muda toka genkai desu toka. “impossible”, “useless”, “it’s reached the limit”. 7,8
Kakko warii choo kakko warii kara They’re uncool, super uncool.
kiki-taku nee. I don’t wanna hear them. 9
 
Omae no sono konjoo tataki-naosu zo. I will beat your ill-nature into shape. 10,11,[ii]
Moyase yo, moyase yo,
    mune no naka ni himeta ikari o!
Burn! Burn your anger hidden inside! [ii]
 
“Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!” “Stop kidding! Hey, you!” 12,13
Katta ka maketa ka kankee nee. It doesn’t matter to win or lose. {ii}
“Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!” “Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
Daiji na koto wa honki ka doo ka dakee. It is only to be serious or not that matters. {ii}
 
Kirai da! Kirai da! Kirai da! Kirai da! I dislike! dislike! dislike! dislike! 2
Kiai da! Kiai da! Kiai da! Kiai da! Fighting spirit! spirit! spirit! spirit! 14
Baka yaroo! You, stupid guy! 15,16
 
Kirai daa, I dislike
honki ja nee noni iiwake bakkari. guys who are not serious but only make excuses. 17
Fuzakenna! Choo iraira suru kara Stop kidding! I got super irritated. 6
sono tsura mukenna! Don’t turn your dirty face to me! 6,18,(ii)
 
Kirai daa, I dislike
deki mo shi-nee noni tsuyogatteru yatsu. guys who can’t do it but pretend to be tough.
Fuzakenna! Maji iraira suru kara Stop kidding! I got really irritated.
kiete kuree! Get out of my sight! 19,(ii)
 
Omae no sono konjoo tataki-naosu zo. I will beat your ill-nature into shape.
Ikari no honoo de
    subete yaki-tsukushite yaru kara.
I will burn up everything with flare of anger.
 
“Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!” “Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
Umai ka heta ka wa kankee nee. It doesn’t matter to be skillful or awkward. {ii}
“Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!” “Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
Hansei shite mo ii kookai shite wa damee. You may think back but may not regret. {ii}
 
Tatakae! Tatakae! Shinobi-yoru yuuwaku to! Fight! Fight against sneaking temptation! 20,[ii]
Tatakae! Tatakae!
    Omaera no ikari o sakebe yo!
Fight! Fight! Shout out your anger! 10,[ii]
 
“Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!” “Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
Gomen ne?  Yurushite?
    Doo shiyoo ka naa?
You say “sorry”?  You say “forgive me”?
    What do I do with you?
21
“Zakkenja nee zoo, oi! ora!” “Stop kidding! Hey, you!”
Uso desu?  Gomasuri?
    Jootoo daa!  Kakatte koi yaa!
It’s a lie?  Flattery?
    Ready for anything!  Bring it on!
21,22,
23,24
 

Notes

  1. There are some words spoken in male voice at the beginning. Some reddit users have found they are from Christians’ “Book of Revelation” (= “Apocalypse”), chapt. 6.: “I watched as the Lamb opened the first of the seven seals. Then I heard one of the four living creatures say in a voice like thunder, ‘Come!'”. I don’t know what these words mean to this song.
  2. “Kirai” (= dislike) is neutral as to hatred. It is never used for those who killed one’s family, etc. In such cases, “nikumu” (verb) or “nikui” (adj.) is used.
  3. “Yatsu” (= manservant?) is a rude word used for a man. It is also used for a thing (e.g. “Akai yatsu o kure!” = Pass me red one!) and sometimes used to express intimacy (e.g. “Ii yatsu da.” = You’re/he’s a good guy). “Gaki” (= starving ogre (Buddhism term) ) is used to abuse a kid, and “ama” (= nun (of Buddhism) ) for a woman, but “ama” isn’t so popular because many people use “yatsu” also for a woman.
  4. “Kakko warî” is literally “the form/appearance is bad”. The antonym is “kakko ii”. “Warî” (warii) is a rude pronunciation of “warui” (= bad).
  5. “Chô” (choo) originally means “super” of “super-sonic”, etc. but young Japanese use it also as “very”.
  6. “Kunna”, “fuzakenna”, “mukenna” are rude contractions of “kuru na”, “fuzakeru na”, “mukeru na”. They are the negative imperative forms (= Don’t —).
  7. “Muri” means “unreasonable” (originally) or “difficult/impossible”. When “muri” is used as refusal, I’m not sure of the proportion of unwillingness and objective/subjective difficulty in the reason.
  8. “Genkai desu.” is literally “It is the limit.”, and in this context, it means “I can’t do anymore”.
  9. “Nê” (nee) is a rude pronunciation of “nai”. It means “not” and is analyzed as an adjective or an auxiliary verb.
  10. “Omae” is a rude word for “you”, but it was originally an honorific word and is still sometimes used to express intimacy.
        Both singular “omae” & plural “omaera” are used, but I’m not so sure whether it is for distinguishing the plurality of “you” or just for matching the number of syllables to the rhythm.
  11. “Konjô” means nature or disposition of a person. It is mainly used for bad one but sometimes used for good one (e.g. “konjô ga aru” = having guts or being patient).
  12. “Zakkenja nê zo!” (= Stop kidding!) is a rude contraction of “fuzakeru no de wa nai zo” (“ja” = “de wa”). Japanese accent is pitch accent, and “fuzakeru” is pronounced “fu_za-ke-ru_” (-:hi, _:low) in Tokyo accent. The initial low syllable is sometimes dropped and the word becomes “zakeru”, then the accent is changed to “za_ke-ru_” according to the general rule of Tokyo accent. “Zakkeru” has a short silence before “k” (called “sokuon”). I guess it is inserted to stress the initial low syllable.
        Only this line (appearing four times) is enclosed in quotation marks, but I don’t know why.
  13. “Oi” is a rude interjection to draw attention. “Ora” is a rude interjection to provoke or agitate someone.
  14. “Kiai” means (fighting) spirit or something. There is a retired pro wrestler, Animal HAMAGUCHI, who shouted “Kiai da!” to charge himself with fighting spirit. I’m not sure whether she charges the guys with it or she means it is a matter of fighting spirit whether things are impossible or not.
  15. “Baka” means a fool but is also used non-abusively. For example, finding a friend’s bad choice, some Japanese say “Baka da na. — sureba yokatta noni.” (= You’re foolish. You should have done —). In many cases, however, they’re not looking down on their friend but just frankly expressing their surprise like “wow” (some people don’t like this saying, though). And when a girl says “Baka, baka, baka!” to her (expected) boyfriend, it sometimes means “Why can’t you understand how much I like/love you?”
  16. “Yarô” originally means a young man. Now it is mainly used to abuse a man, but there is also non-abusive use such as “Torakku Yarô” (movie title) which refers to independent truck drivers.
  17. “Bakkari” (= only) is an emphasizing pronunciation of “bakari”.
  18. “Tsura” means a face. Now it sounds rude (except used in some compound words) but has no nuance of “dirty”.
  19. “Kiete kure!” (= Disappear!) is rude but a request because “kure” is the non-polite form of “kudasai” and means “give me/us”. The simple imperative is “Kiero!” and there is the emphasized phrase “Kie usero!” (“usero” too means “disappear”) which too has 5 morae and is replaceable here.
  20. At first, I thought “shinobi-yoru yuuwaku” (= sneaking temptation) probably means that there are both some (other) undesirable state (which is not yet realized) and some tendency towards it and they are difficult to notice, but that undesirable state may simply be that the guys would no longer feel anger.
  21. “Gomen ne?”, “Yurushite?”, “Uso desu?” & “Gomasuri?” are guys’ apologies, etc. with question marks. They mean “You say [ — ] ?”.
  22. At first, I thought “uso desu” (= it’s a lie) is an excuse negating guys’ words that offended her, but it seems to negate preceding “sorry” & “forgive me”, so she gets angry again and shouts “Bring it on!”.
        (Unnecessary addition:) It sounds, however, unnatural to me because, if one negates one’s apology voluntarily & immediately, it is likely that one had some bad intent and say more maliciously like “うっそだよーん” (usso da yôn) than “uso desu”. However, afterwards when one is asked “Why did you say so then?”, one may answer honestly “It was a lie, just flattery.”
  23. “Jôtô” means a high class/quality. It sometimes means satisfaction or welcome, and sometimes ironically (e.g. “0 ten? Jôtô da!” = Rated 0/10? It’s welcome!). Here, however, I don’t translate it to “welcome” because it is hardly ironic to welcome flattery.
  24. “Kakatte koi ya” is the imperative “come to attack me”. “Ya” is an emphasizing particle used in Osaka, etc. (“yo” in Tokyo, etc). Probably the lyric writers chose “ya(a)” because Osaka dialect sounds strong.
        (Unnecessary addition:) However, what makes it sounds strong is its accent (ka-kat-te-ko-i_ya_; -:high, _:low), but actually they shout it in Tokyo accent (ka_kat-te_ko-i_ya_) and it is difficult to stress the initial low syllable, so it doesn’t sound so strong as a native Osaka shouts.

Continue readingSis. Anger

[atTowerRecords’13Mar.20]

This video is a copy of [ http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xyc4rd ] with English subtitles. The source is a streaming program “Idol 36-bou” broadcast on 2013 Mar. 20th by Tower Records. Miss Suzuka NAKAMOTO did this interview 11 days before she graduat… … Continue reading[atTowerRecords’13Mar.20]

* Aogeba Tôtoshi

This is not BABYMETAL’s song but a famous graduation song which Sakura Gakuin covered. The translation is of Sakura Gakuin’s own interpretation of it (the lyric is old-fashioned, so Sakura Gakuin were told the meanings of the words and they interpreted the lyric in their own situation). In [At TowerRecords ’15 Mar. 5th], Miss Yui said she hoped to let Sakura Gakuin’s fans know what members felt on their graduation, so I have translated it. Their interpretation was displayed on the MV that was presented by Gyao only from 2015 Mar. 3rd to 8th.

Released on 2015 Mar. 4th.
Lyric: The Music Research Center of the Ministry of Education / Music: H. N. D. / Arr.: KenKen

Aogeba Tôtoshi (from Sakura Gakuin 2014)

If we look back, we were thankfully supported always by our graduates, our staff, and our fans.
Since we entered Sakura Gakuin, how many years have passed?
Though we have experienced various things, our school life has passed so quickly.
Now is the time to depart. Until the day we meet again.

When we were together, we felt everything we did to be delightful.
Even after graduation parts us away, our bonds shall never fade.
Towards becoming a super lady who can be active worldwide, we continue to advance.
Today is the day to depart. Until the day we meet again.

Until we got exhausted, we exercised together in our studio.
Feeling regret, we have cried many times. We have always faced seriously and supported each other.
The memories with the members, we will never forget, even after we grow up.
Now the time has come. Good-bye until the day we meet again.

We are parting now. Bye-bye.
This is a new departure. Bye-bye.
Until the day we meet again.


Romaji lyric, translation of the original lyric, the original lyric & their interpretation in Japanese are below.

About Sakura Gakuin (its jargons, its graduation system, etc.), see note [iii] of [that post].

[v] About “Aogeba Totôshi” & Other Graduation Songs in Japan

“仰げば尊し” (Aogeba Tôtoshi) was published in 1884 as one of “monbu-shô shôka” (= the recommended songs of the Ministry of Education). It is a rip-off of an unknown American graduation song (discovered in 2011). The tone of the lyrics resembles the original, but two lines were added/replaced by the needs of Japanese then society: “Aogeba tootoshi wa ga shi no on.” (= If we look up at, precious is the benefit given by our teachers) “Mi o tate na o age yayo hageme yo” (= To rise in the world, to win fame, let’s try hard!)

Even after the World War II, almost all Japanese schools continued to sing it in their graduation ceremonies, but since about 1970?, schools stopped it one after another. Probably some students claimed like “We want to sing what we like (or that teachers should not force students to thank teachers)”. I was told “You can choose any song you like except Aogeba Totoshi” by our teachers. In 21st century, such ill feelings seem to disappear probably because the lyrics are too archaic for young people to understand.

Sakura Gakuin’s version is arranged in a rock style by a rock musician. If released in 20th century, such arrangement should have been criticized by the old people (in 1984, a Japanese hardcore punk band “The Stalin” (ENDÔ Michirô) already covered this song).

“蛍の光” (Hotaru no Hikari; lit. “Fireflies’ Glow”) is also “monbu-sho shoka” (pub. in 1881) and popular as a graduation song. The melody is borrowed from a famous Scotch song “Auld Lang Syne”. The title & the first line come from Chinese historical facts (see note #7 below).

“贈る言葉” (Okuru Kotoba; lit. “The Words to Give”) is popular, too. It is the theme song of a school drama in 1979, and the singer of a band “Kaientai” who acted the class teacher wrote & sang it. He said like it was written as if to give to his ex-girlfriend who had left him. I think the lyrics are not so fit for the graduates to sing, but many Japanese seem not to care about it.

“旅立ちの日に” (Tabidachi no Hi ni; lit. “On the Day of Departure”) may now be the most popular graduation song in Japan. There was a junior highschool that had overcome students’ violence by the joy of singing. As the final stage, the principal wrote the lyric, the music teacher wrote the melody, and all the teachers sang it in their graduation ceremony 1991. Since the next year, the students sang it, and it gradually became famous in the neighborhood, then in Japan. The lyrics are fit for the graduates to sing except one line (not “we” but “you are going to fly away”).

“桜” (Sakura; lit. “Cherry Blossom”) is written & sung by a duo “Kobukuro” (rel. in 2005). The lyrics are like: “Every time cherry blossom petals fall and scatter, one more feeling which can’t reach someone is wiped away by the tears and the smiles, and we grow a little older”. Also other musicians have written & sing other “Sakura” and the tone of the lyrics somewhat resemble. In many areas of Japan, cherry blossoms bloom & fall in the weeks of graduation ceremonies & entrance ceremonies.

In Japan, there are many other songs that were written for graduation ceremonies or that students associate with graduation.


Aogeba Tôtoshi (from Sakura Gakuin 2014)

romaji lyric English translation
    of Sakura Gakuin’s own interpretation
notes
 
Aogeba tootoshi wa ga shi no on. If we look back, we were thankfully
    supported always by our graduates, our staff, and our fans.
1
Oshie no niwa ni mo haya iku tose. Since we entered Sakura Gakuin,
    how many years have passed?
Omoeba ito toshi kono toshitsuki. Though we have experienced various things,
    our school life has passed so quickly.
Ima koso wakareme. Iza saraba. Now is the time to depart. Until the day we meet again. 2
 
Tagai ni mutsumishi higoro no on. When we were together,
    we felt everything we did to be delightful.
Wakaruru nochi ni mo yayo wasuru na. Even after graduation parts us away,
    our bonds shall never fade.
Mi o tate na o age yayo hageme yo. Towards becoming a super lady who can be active worldwide,
    we continue to advance.
3
Ima koso wakareme. Iza saraba. Today is the day to depart. Until the day we meet again.
 
Asayuu narenishi manabi no mado. Until we got exhausted,
    we exercised together in our studio.
Hotaru no tomosibi tsumu shirayuki. Feeling regret, we have cried many times.
    We have always faced seriously and supported each other.
4
Wasururu ma zo naki yuku toshitsuki. The memories with the members,
    we will never forget, even after we grow up.
Ima koso wakareme. Iza saraba. Now the time has come.
    Good-bye until the day we meet again.
2
 
Iza saraba. We are parting now. Bye-bye. 5
Iza saraba. This is a new departure. Bye-bye.
Iza saraba. Until the day we meet again.

Notes

  1. “Aogeba” (= aogu) means “to look up at/to” and “tootoshi” means “precious”. Sakura Gakuin replaced these with “kureta” (= kureru; lit. “give”). This is a very common word which should be attached to every verb that refers to other’s action that is beneficial to the speaker.
  2. Sakura Gakuin replaced “saraba” with “mata au hi made”. I insert “good-bye” as supplement on the third time. “Saraba” is an archaic form of “sayônara”. Both are most common words for leaving. Both literally mean “if it is so” & imply “if that is all to be done”, etc., and the ‘then’ clause “then I leave you now”, etc. is omitted.
        For “また逢う日まで” (mata au hi made), “お元気で” (o-genki de) or “お幸せに” (o-shiawase ni) or something is omitted (but not so often omitted). That is “{ Take care of yourself / I wish you happy } until the day we meet again”. The date is, however, undetermined. This phrase suggests the day may never come. It was used as the title of a movie in which a man becomes a soldier and goes to war leaving his sweetheart.
  3. In many Japanese music textbooks, the whole second chorus is now omitted (since about 1980?). The publishers said some teachers had claimed “mi o tate na o age” (= to rise in the world, to win fame) is difficult to teach. In developing countries or in growing industries, those who really make the society rich, as a result, rise in the world and win the fame, but there are only few such honest chances in mature societies.
        Sakura Gakuin replaced these with “becoming a super lady” which is one of Sakura Gakuin’s Principles. The goals are difficult to find. I don’t want Sakura Gakuin’s graduates to think it so seriously that they die young like rock musicians in 1960s & 1970s.
  4. Just like “蛍の光” (Hotaru no Hikari), “hotaru no tomoshibi” & “tsumu shirayuki” come from Chinese historical facts(?) that, instead of lamps, one poor boy studied under fireflies’ glow and another studied with the moonlight reflected by the snow, and afterwards both became high governmental officials.
        Sakura Gakuin replaced the facts with their own hard days, but those who don’t know the historical facts may think this phrase simply means various things in summer and winter (= in a year).
  5. The original lyric doesn’t contain these 3 lines.

Aogeba Tôtoshi (original 1884)

romaji lyric English translation notes
 
Aogeba tootoshi wa ga shi no on. If we look up at, precious is the benefit given by our teachers.   1
Oshie no niwa ni mo haya iku tose. In this school, how many years have we already spent?   6
Omoeba ito toshi kono toshitsuki. If we think back, so quickly these years have gone.
Ima koso wakareme. Iza saraba. Let’s part away just now! Farewell now.   2
 
Tagai ni mutsumishi higoro no on. We were intimate with each other. Those days are the benefit.
Wakaruru nochi ni mo yayo wasuru na. Even after we part away, never forget it!
Mi o tate na o age yayo hageme yo. To rise in the world, to win fame, let’s try hard!   3
Ima koso wakareme. Iza saraba. Let’s part away just now! Farewell now.
 
Asayuu narenishi manabi no mado. We were always familiar with this class room.   7,8
Hotaru no tomosibi tsumu shirayuki. Fireflies glowed in summer. White snow lay in winter.   4
Wasururu ma zo naki yuku toshitsuki. We shall never forget for a moment these passing years.
Ima koso wakareme. Iza saraba. Let’s part away just now! Farewell now.

Notes

  1. “Oshie no niwa” is literally “the garden of teaching”. It is an obsolete idiom for a school campus.
  2. “Asayuu” is literally “morning & evening”, but it is used here to mean “all the day” or “every day”.
  3. “Manabi no mado” is literally “the window of learning”. It is an obsolete idiom for a class room.

仰げば尊し (original 1884)

仰げば尊し 我が師の恩
教への庭にも はや幾年
思へばいと疾し この年月
今こそ別れめ いざさらば

互いに睦し 日頃の恩
分かるる後にも やよ忘るな
身を立て名を上げ やよ励めよ
今こそ別れめ いざさらば

朝夕馴れにし 学びの窓
蛍の灯火 積む白雪
忘るる間ぞ無き 行く年月
今こそ別れめ いざさらば

(* In some texts, some words are written in kana instead of kanji.)

仰げば尊し (from Sakura Gakuin 2014)

振り返ってみると、いつも支えてくれたのは、卒業生や先生方 そして父兄の皆さん
さくら学院に入学して何年たっただろう?
色んなことがあったけど、あっという間の学院生活
さぁ、旅立つ時 また逢う日まで。

一緒にいると何をしてても楽しく感じた日々。
卒業して離れ離れになっても、褪せることのない 絆
世界で活躍できるスーパーレディーに向かって、歩み続ける
さぁ、旅立ちの日 また逢う日まで。

クタクタになるまで一緒にレッスンしたスタジオ
悔しくて何度も泣いて、どんな時も本気で向き合って、支え合ってきた
みんなとの想い出、大人になっても絶対忘れないよ
さぁ、時が来た また逢う日まで。

これでお別れだね、じゃあね!!
新しい出発だよね、バイバイ!
また逢う日まで。

Continue reading* Aogeba Tôtoshi

[atTowerRecords ’15 Mar.5]

This is a copy of a live streaming program “Idol 36-bou” broadcast by [Tower Revolve Project] on 2015 Mar. 5th with English subtitles. I thank the fan who recorded & uploaded this on the internet. It is a talk session of Moa KIKUCHI, Yui MIZUNO, Ha… … Continue reading[atTowerRecords ’15 Mar.5]

[Update History]

I record the substantial update history of the site (limited within what I remember). Blogger’s feeds reports the recent updates, but it’s not so useful because even mere corrections of mis-spelling are included. 2018 Nov. 4th & 5thArticles of visu… … Continue reading[Update History]

THE ONE

Released on 2016 Apr. 1st, included in “METAL RESISTANCE”.   [MV]Lyric: KITUSNE of METAL GOD, KxBxMETAL / Music: Mish-Mosh / Arr.: tatsuo, Mish-Mosh THE ONEEnglish Version LyricsEnglish Translation of Japanese Lyricdifferent  No reason why&nb… … Continue readingTHE ONE

KARATE

Released on 2016 Feb. 26th as download-only single,   [MV]
Included in “METAL RESISTANCE” (released on 2016 Apr. 1st).
Lyric: Yuyoyuppe / Music: Yuyoyuppe / Arr.: YUPPEMETAL

KARATE

Seiya se se se seiya.
Seiya se se se seiya.
Soiya so so so soiya.
Soiya so so so soiya.

[Ossu.]  Even if tears spill from our eyes,
[Ossu.]  let’s confront it!

Single-mindedly, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
with our fists more… with our spirits more…
with making all sharper.
  [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Still more, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
even if we get sad and unable to stand up.
  [Ah ossu ossu.]

Seiya se se se seiya.
Seiya se se se seiya.
Soiya so so so soiya.
Soiya so so so soiya.

[Ossu.]  Even if our spirits are broken,
[Ossu.]  let’s confront it!

Single-mindedly, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
with our fists more… with our spirits more…
with making all sharper.
  [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh]
Still more, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
even if we get sad and unable to stand up.

  [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.
   Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Seiya soiya, let’s fight on
  [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
with making all sharper.
  [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Seiya soiya, let’s fight on
  [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
with making all sharper.
  [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]

Single-mindedly, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
with our fists more… with our spirits more…
with making all sharper.
  [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Still more, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
even if we get sad and unable to stand up.

Run!
  [Seiya soiya, let’s fight on.]
  [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Run!
  [With making all sharper.]

  [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.
   Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.
   Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.
   Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]


  ROMAJI LYRIC AND NOTES ARE BELOW.

[i] About the Performance & the Lyrics of This Song

This tune was performed for the first time on 2015 Dec. 12th at Yokohama Arena. Since then, it was tentatively called “Seiya” or “Karate”. On 2016 Feb. 26th, this tune was released (download-only) as the preceding single of the second album.

I feel it strange that, though this is a song of fighting spirit, the latter part of this tune doesn’t seem to have enough of it.

[ii] About Karate

The choreography and the lyrics of this song contain some elements from karate, but I don’t know to what extent they are true to karate.

Karate is a martial art developed in Ryûkyû Kingdom (now belonging to Japan and called “Okinawa”). Karate was introduced to mainland Japan in 1920s. Unlike judo, karate is a striking martial art using punching, kicking, etc. The practice of karate is to master “kata” (= formalized sequences of movements). In a match of traditional karate schools, punching, kicking, etc. must be stopped just before hitting to prevent injury (this is called “寸止め” (sundome) ), but there are also full-contact karate schools.

In general, Japanese martial arts place great importance on the spirit of courtesy. Mental strength is needed to achieve top performance and seriousness is needed to prevent injury in practice. Thus martial arts have become ways of completing one’s character through hard training.

[iii] About the Call and Response in Concerts

In the concerts from 2016 may onwards (as of 2017 Jan.), the call & response has been inserted in the middle part repeating “Wo’oh, wo’oh, wo’oh”, and the audience are requested to jump at the end. There have been some differences according to time and place, and I’m sorry if I misheard them.

[su] How you feel it today?
[su] Make us hear your voice!
[su] Put your hands in the air!
[su] Wo’oh…
[su] Come on! Sing together with us!
*[su] Wo’oh, wo’oh, wo’oh.
[audience] Wo’oh, wo’oh, wo’oh.*
    ( *-* repeated )
[su] Seiya soiya tatakau-nda.
[audience] Wo’oh, wo’oh, wo’oh.
[su] Zenbu zenbu togisumashite.
[audience] Wo’oh, wo’oh, wo’oh.
[su] Seiya soiya tatakau-nda.
[audience] Wo’oh, wo’oh, wo’oh.
[su] Zenbu zenbu togisumashite.
[su] Everybody, jump!

at Tokyo Dome on 2016 Sep. 19th
[su] How you feel tonight?
[su] How you feel tonight, Tokyo Dome?
[su] Let us hear your voice!
[su] Put your hands in the air!
[su] Wo’oh…
*[su] Wo’oh, wo’oh, wo’oh.
[audience] Wo’oh, wo’oh, wo’oh.*
    ( *-* repeated )
[su] Seiya soiya tatakau-nda.
[su] Everybody, shout!

KARATE

Romaji Lyric English Translation Notes
 
Seiya se se se seiya. Seiya se se se seiya. 1,MY
Seiya se se se seiya. Seiya se se se seiya. MY
Soiya so so so soiya. Soiya so so so soiya. 1,MY
Soiya so so so soiya. Soiya so so so soiya. MY
 
[Ossu.]  Namida koborete mo [Ossu.]  Even if tears spill from our eyes, 2
[Ossu.]  tachimukatte yukoo ze! [Ossu.]  let’s confront it! 3
 
Hitasura seiya soiya tatakau-nda, Single-mindedly, seiya soiya, let’s fight on 4
kobushi o motto kokoro o motto with our fists more… with our spirits more… 5
zenbu zenbu togisumashite. with making all sharper. 6
  [Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.]   [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Mada mada seiya soiya tatakau-nda, Still more, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
kanashiku natte tachiagare-naku natte mo. even if we get sad and unable to stand up.
  [Aa ossu ossu.]   [Ah ossu ossu.]
 
Seiya se se se seiya. Seiya se se se seiya. MY
Seiya se se se seiya. Seiya se se se seiya. MY
Soiya so so so soiya. Soiya so so so soiya. MY
Soiya so so so soiya. Soiya so so so soiya. 7,MY
 
[Ossu.]  Kokoro orarete mo [Ossu.]  Even if our spirits are broken, 8
[Ossu.]  tachimukatte yukoo ze! [Ossu.]  let’s confront it!
 
Hitasura seiya soiya tatakau-nda, Single-mindedly, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
kobushi o motto kokoro o motto with our fists more… with our spirits more…
zenbu zenbu togisumashite. with making all sharper.
  [Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.]   [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Mada mada seiya soiya tatakau-nda, Still more, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
kanashiku natte tachiagare-naku natte mo. even if we get sad and unable to stand up.
 
  [Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.   [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.
   Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.]    Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Seiya soiya tatakau-nda, Seiya soiya, let’s fight on 9
  [Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.]   [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
zenbu zenbu togisumashite. with making all sharper. 9
  [Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.]   [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Seiya soiya tatakau-nda, Seiya soiya, let’s fight on 9
  [Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.]   [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
zenbu zenbu togisumashite. with making all sharper. 9
  [Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.]   [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
 
Hitasura seiya soiya tatakau-nda, Single-mindedly, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
kobushi o motto kokoro o motto with our fists more… with our spirits more…
zenbu zenbu togisumashite. with making all sharper.
  [Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.]   [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Mada mada seiya soiya tatakau-nda, Still more, seiya soiya, let’s fight on
kanashiku natte tachiagare-naku natte mo. even if we get sad and unable to stand up.
 
Hashire! Run! 10
  [Seiya soiya tatakau-nda.]   [Seiya soiya, let’s fight on.] 11
  [Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.]   [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
Hashire! Run!
  [Zenbu zenbu togisumashite.]   [With making all sharper.] 11
 
  [Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.   [Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.
   Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.    Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.
   Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.    Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.
   Wo’oo wo’oo wo’oo.]    Wo’oh wo’oh wo’oh.]
 

Notes

  1. The lines marked with “MY” & the enclosed phrases [—] are sung by MOAMETAL & YUIMETAL (added on 2017 Mar. 31).
  2. “Seiya” & “soiya” seem to be the shouts of some karate school that are uttered with punching, kicking, etc. The shouts of other karate schools and other martial arts seem a bit simpler.
        “Se se se” & “so so so” are mere meaningless repetitions. I changed the notation “sessesse”/”sossosso” to “se se se”/”so so so” according to the official lyric (appended on 2016 Oct 8).
  3. “Ossu” (オッス) is probably an abbreviation of “ohayoo gozai masu” (= good morning). The ending “u” is usually unvoiced. It is an easy greeting (like “hi”) used by boys & young guys. Among martial artists, however, the tone is hard and it is often used like “yes, sir!” of military greeting. To distinguish this, martial artists’ “ossu” is often written as “押忍”. These kanji mean to push and to restrain oneself.
  4. The Original line has no grammatical object. I supplement the sentence with “it” which refers to some difficulty that is not told in these lyrics.
  5. “-nda” (= no da) grammatically corresponds to “it is the case that …” and the original line has no grammatical subject. In this context, it probably expresses “I will (fight)”, “we should (fight)” or the imperative mood.
        “Yukoo ze” in the preceding line means “let’s (go)”, so I take “-nda” this way and I complement several sentences with “we” & “our” (the original lyrics have none for personal pronoun).
  6. Listening to the song, this line sounds to me as if (imperative) sentences missing verbs, i.e. “[verb] our fists more [adj.]! [verb] our spirits more [adj.]!”. Probably these phrases are examples of the next line ([verb]=”make”, [adj.]=” sharp”).
  7. “Togi” (= togu) means to whet/sharpen knives, swords, etc. and “sumasu” means to clarify. “Togisumasu” is mainly used for sharpening mental activity.
  8. Here are three “so” (so so so) since the first performance. I’m sorry for missing the first “so”.
  9. It means “even if somebody/something discourage us”. Japanese usually uses the intransitive verb (= “oreru”) rather than the passive form of the transitive verb (= “orareru”), so this form suggests that one is conscious of the external cause.
  10. In the studio take, MOAMETAL & YUIMETAL may have sung these lines with or instead of SU-METAL as Sakura Metal san on 2016 Jun. 28 pointed out, but I’m not sure because the audio processing made them ambiguous. In the live performances, SU-METAL’s lips move with these lines and MOAMETAL’s & YUIMETAL’s lips move with “wo’oh, wo’oh, wo’oh”. (Added on 2017 Mar. 31.)
  11. “Run!” might be inappropriate here if taken as “run away” or “escape” (as commented by Halfi Desfarizly san on 2016 Nov. 4th), but the interpretation of “Hashire!” is difficult. Usually not “Hashire!” but “Ike!” (= Go!) or “Susume!” (= Advance!) is used to command an attack. “Hashire!” means a physical movement, but I’m not sure which direction (towards or away from the enemy) the lyric writer has in mind because guerrillas never give up but often run away. (Added on 2017 Jan. 20.)
  12. On the first & second performance (2015 Dec. 12th&13th), one line was inserted before these lines and both sequences were “Hashire! / [Seiya soiya tatakau-nda] / [zenbu zenbu togisumashite]”.

<!–

新曲「セイヤ!」(仮題)

セイヤ セッセッセ セイヤ
セイヤ セッセッセ セイヤ
ソイヤ ソッソッソ ソイヤ
ソイヤ ソッソッソ ソイヤ

[押忍] 涙こぼれても、
[押忍] 立ち向かって行こうぜ。

ひたすらセイヤソイヤ戦うんだ。
拳をもっと、心をもっと、
全部全部研ぎ澄まして。
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]

まだまだセイヤソイヤ戦うんだ。
悲しくなって立ち上がれなくなっても。
[あー押忍押忍]

セイヤ セッセッセ セイヤ
セイヤ セッセッセ セイヤ
ソイヤ ソッソッソ ソイヤ
ソイヤ ソソソ ソイヤ

[押忍] 心折られても、
[押忍] 立ち向かって行こうぜ。

ひたすらセイヤソイヤ戦うんだ。
拳をもっと、心をもっと、
全部全部研ぎ澄まして。
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]

まだまだセイヤソイヤ戦うんだ。
悲しくなって立ち上がれなくなっても。

[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]

セイヤソイヤ戦うんだ。
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]
全部全部研ぎ澄まして。
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]

セイヤソイヤ戦うんだ。
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]
全部全部研ぎ澄まして。
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]

ひたすらセイヤソイヤ戦うんだ。
拳をもっと、心をもっと、
全部全部研ぎ澄まして。
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]

まだまだセイヤソイヤ戦うんだ、
悲しくなって立ち上がれなくなっても。

走れ!
[セイヤソイヤ戦うんだ。]
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]
走れ!
[全部全部研ぎ澄まして。]

[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]
[ウォオーウォオーウォオー]

–> … Continue readingKARATE

[REDNIQS ’15 Sep. 21]

This is a part of a radio program “REDNIQS” broadcast by FM802 on 2015 Sep. 21st. The interview was recorded on 2015 Sep. 17th. The audio source is what a BABYMETAL fan in Osaka airchecked and kindly uploaded on the internet. I am sorry if I’ve mistake… … Continue reading[REDNIQS ’15 Sep. 21]

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